Where Science and Faith Converge
  • Hagfish Slime Expands the Case for a Creator

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Mar 08, 2017

    The designs found in biological systems never cease to amaze me. Even something as gross and seemingly insignificant as hagfish slime displays remarkable properties, befitting the handiwork of a Creator. In fact, the design of hagfish slime is so ingenious, it is serving as the source of inspiration for researchers from the US Navy in their quest to develop new types of military technology.

    What Are Hagfish?

    Hagfish are ancient creatures that first appeared on Earth around 520 million years ago, with representative specimens recovered in the Cambrian fossil assemblages. These eel-like creatures are about 20 inches in length with loose fitting skin that varies in color from pink to blue-gray, depending on the species.

    The hagfish are jawless but have a mineralized encasement around their skull (cranium). With eyespots instead of true eyes, these creatures have no vision. Hagfish are bottom-dwellers. To explore their environment, they make use of whisker-like structures. As scavengers, hagfish consume dead and dying creatures by burrowing into their bodies and ingesting the remains from the inside out. Remarkably, hagfish absorb nutrients through their skin and gills, in addition to feeding with their mouths. In fact, researchers estimate that close to half their nutrient intake comes through absorption.

    Hagfish Slime

    When disturbed or attacked by predators, hagfish secrete a slime from about 100 glands that line the flanks of their bodies. (This behavior explains why hagfish are sometimes called slime eels.) Produced by epithelial and gland thread cells, the slime rapidly expands to 10,000 times its original volume. A single hagfish can generate around 5.5 gallons of slime each time its disturbed. Once secreted, the slime coats the gills of attacking fish, suffocating the predator. With the predator distracted, the hagfish performs this defensive maneuver that allows it to escape, while scrapping the slime off its body to prevent self-suffocation.

    Two different types of proteins comprise hagfish slime. One of the components, mucin, is a large protein found widely throughout nature, serving as the primary component of mucus. Secreted by epithelial cells, mucin interacts with water molecules, restricting their movement, contributing to the slime’s viscosity.1

    Additionally, hagfish slime consists of long, thread-like proteins. These protein threads are 12 nanometers in diameter and 15 centimeters long! (That is one big molecule.) These dimensions equate to a rope that is 1 centimeter in diameter and 1.5 kilometers in length. These protein fibers are incredibly strong, equivalent to a string that is 100 times thinner than a strand of human hair, but 10 times stronger than a piece of nylon.

    Inside the gland thread cells, these protein fibers are carefully packaged like a skein of yarn, held together by other proteins that serve as a type of molecular glue.2 When the secreted hagfish slime contacts seawater, the glue proteins dissolve, leading to an explosive unraveling of the protein skeins, without any of the fibers becoming tangled. The protein threads contribute to the slime’s viscoelastic properties and provide the mechanism for the rapid swelling of the slime.

    Hagfish Slime Inspires Military Technologies

    The unusual and ingenious properties of the slime and the slime’s thread proteins have inspired researchers from the US Navy to explore their use in military technology. For example, the remarkable durability of the protein fibers (reminiscent of Kevlar) suggests an application for them in bulletproof vests. The properties of the hagfish slime could also be used as a flame retardant and a shark repellent for Navy divers.

    Other commercial labs are exploring applications that include food packaging, bungee cords, and bandages. In fact, some have gone as far as to dub the thread proteins as the ultimate biodegradable biofiber.

    Biomimetics and the Case for a Creator

    In recent years, engineers have routinely and systematically benefited by insights from biology to address engineering problems and to inspire new technologies by either directly copying (or mimicking) designs from biology, or using insights from biological designs to guide the engineering enterprise.

    From my perspective, the use of biological designs to guide engineering efforts fits awkwardly within the evolutionary paradigm. Why? Because evolutionary biologists view biological systems as the products of an unguided, historically contingent process that co-opts preexisting systems to cobble together new ones. Evolutionary mechanisms can optimize these systems, but they are still kludges.

    Given the unguided nature of evolutionary mechanisms, does it make sense for engineers to rely on biological systems to solve problems and inspire new technologies? Conversely, biomimetics and bioinspiration find a natural home in a creation model approach to biology. Using designs in nature to inspire engineering makes sense only if these designs arose from an intelligent Mind—even if they are as disgusting as the slime secreted by a bottom-dwelling scavenger.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Lukas Böni et al., “Hagfish Slime and Mucin Flow Properties and Their Implications for Defense,” Scientific Reports 6 (July 2016): id. 30371, doi:10.1038/srep30371.
    2. Timothy Winegard et al., “Coiling and Maturation of a High-Performance Fibre in Hagfish Slime Gland Thread Cells,” Nature Communications 5 (April 2014): id. 3534, doi:10.1038/ncomms4534; Mark A. Bernards Jr. et al., “Spontaneous Unraveling of Hagfish Slime Thread Skeins Is Mediated by a Seawater-Soluble Protein Adhesive,” Journal of Experimental Biology 217 (April 2014): 1263–68, doi:10.1242/jeb.096909.
  • The Remarkable Scientific Accuracy of Psalm 139

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Mar 01, 2017

    For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well.

    – Psalm 139:13–14

    Psalm 139 has been on my mind quite a bit lately. Maybe it’s because I have recently written a couple of articles about the incredible design of human pregnancy—design that highlights just how fearfully and wonderfully human beings are made.

    Posting these articles to my Facebook page prompted one of my Facebook friends, Eric, to ask a thought-provoking question:

    “Psalm 139:13 says God ‘knit’ us in our mother’s womb. This sounds a lot to me like DNA replication. Is this reading science into the text?”

    Given the importance of DNA replication to embryological development and the specific features of the replication process, I understand why Eric would want to make that comparison. While I think that there are passages in Scripture that anticipate (even predict) scientific discoveries, I don’t see Psalm 139 referring to DNA replication. (By the way, I appreciate Eric’s caution about reading science into the text.)

    Having said that, I do think that the description of God knitting each one of us together in our mother’s womb is an apt analogy for the process of embryological development at the cellular level, because both knitting and development are predicated on forethought and rely on a special type of information—qualities that reflect the activity of an Intelligent Agent.

    An Overview of Embryo Growth and Development

    Embryological development begins the moment the egg cell (oocyte) becomes fertilized by a sperm cell, yielding a zygote. In turn, the zygote undergoes several rounds of cell division (referred to as cleavage) to produce a berry-like structure, called a morula. All of this happens by the third or fourth day of pregnancy.

    Over the next couple of days, the morula undergoes changes that characterize the process of embryogenesis. In addition to undergoing growth and division, cells in the morula begin to migrate relative to one another to form a structure with a hollow sphere called a blastula. Within the sphere is a clump of cells called the inner cell mass.
    Development of the embryo

    The next stage in embryogenesis sees the inner cell mass transform into a stack of three cellular layers (called germ layers) through cell growth, division, and migration. At this stage, the embryo is referred to as the gastrula.

    The specific cell layers of the gastrula are labeled: (1) the ectoderm, (2) the mesoderm, and (3) the endoderm. Each of these cell layers is fated to develop into different organ systems in the body. The ectoderm forms the nervous system and the epidermis of the skin. The mesoderm forms muscles, the skeletal system, blood and blood vessels, and the dermis of the skin. The endoderm forms the linings of the digestive and respiratory systems, and organs that comprise the digestive system, such as the liver and pancreas.

    After gastrulation, the next stage involves organ formation. Organogenesis begins in each of the individual cell layers and involves the careful orchestration of several processes, including cell growth, cell division, cell-to-cell communication, cell migration, differentiation of cells into specialized types, secretion of extracellular materials, and even cell death (which is necessary to sculpt the tissues and organs).

    These cellular processes are directed by the complex interplay between gene networks within the cells (with genes turning on and off) and chemical gradients produced from materials secreted by the cells. Some scientists think that bioelectric fields generated by the cells of the developing embryo also direct embryogenesis.1 The patterns formed by the chemical gradients and bioelectric fields direct the movements, differentiation, and behavior of the embryonic cells. Still, the scientific community is unclear what ultimately determines the chemical gradient and bioelectric field patterns. To put it another way, while scientists are beginning to understand the role that chemical gradients and bioelectric fields play in development, they have no idea where the instructions ultimately come from that direct individual cells in the developing embryo to contribute to and, in turn, respond to the chemical gradients and bioelectric fields that guide embryonic development.

    Perhaps the problem has to do with the fact that the scientific community views embryogenesis from a strictly materialistic/naturalistic framework. But what if embryo development were to be examined from a creation model vantage point?

    Embryological Development and the Case for Intelligent Design

    Remarkably, the instructions for embryogenesis appear to be instantiated in the cells that make up the developing embryo. From a creation model perspective, these instructions must come from a Mind, because instructions are a form of information (specifically, algorithmic information) and common experience teaches that algorithms emanate from a Mind. Toward that end, origin-of-life researchers Paul Davies and Sara Walker recently acknowledged that currently there is no evolutionary explanation for algorithmic information instantiated in living matter.2

    Another reason to think that embryological development stems from a Creator’s involvement relates to the foresight required to formulate the instructions so that they lead to the desired outcome for embryogenesis. Evolutionary processes do not have foresight. Foresight also reflects the work of a Mind. If these instructions are flawed for even a single cell during the early stages of development, the consequences would be disastrous, with the offspring turning into a “developmental monster,” compromised in its capacity to survive and reproduce. To put it differently, it is hard to envision how evolutionary processes could generate the algorithmic information needed for embryogenesis through trial and error, without the benefit of foresight.

    To help make this point clear, consider the analogy between embryogenesis and the routine performed by cheerleaders during a competition.3 Throughout the performance, each cheerleader has a specific set of movements and actions she will perform. Before the performance, her coach instructs her in exactly what to do, when to do it, and where to do it on the mat. Her individual movements and actions are different from every other team member, but when performed in conjunction with her teammates (who have their own set of instructions), the outcome can be dazzling. All this is possible, because the coach choreographed the routine ahead of the performance, with an eye toward how the routine would unfold at different stages of the performance. That is, the routine was intelligently designed with the benefit of the coach’s foresight and that design was implemented through the instructions given to each girl. If not for the coach’s foresight and instructions, chaos would ensue during the performance as each girl did whatever seemed right to her at the time.

    In like manner, during embryogenesis, each cell harbors a set of instructions that tell it: (1) what chemicals and how much of these materials to secrete to establish the gradients needed to guide development, (2) when to reproduce, (3) when and where to migrate, (4) when to differentiate, (5) when and what materials to secrete to form the extracellular matrix, and (6) when to die. In a sense, the cells are like cheerleaders. And the process of embryological development is akin to the choreography of a cheer routine. The only difference: the choreography of embryological development is much more complex, elaborate, and sophisticated.

    As with cheerleading, someone must give the cells instructions ahead of time with the end goal of embryological development in view. And I see that “someone” as the Creator.

    Knit Together in the Womb

    I also find “knitting” an apt metaphor for embryological development. My mother is an avid knitter. And whenever I watch her knit, I can’t help but recognize the similarities to a cheer routine. Knitting consists of a choreography, of sorts. Someone who knits a sweater has a final product in mind before she even picks up needles and chooses the yarn. Making use of a set of instructions—algorithmic information—that tells her which yarn to use and which knitting strokes to employ, she performs a series of actions that will eventually lead to the final product, though what that product is may not be evident at the instant those actions are performed, at least to the uninitiated.

    In this context, it is intriguing that David, the author of Psalm 139, would describe embryological development as a knitting process. David writes,

    “Your eyes saw my unformed body; all the days ordained for me were written in your book before one of them came to be.”

    – Psalm 139:16

    In light of what we have learned about embryological development, I find the scientific prescience of Psalm 139 remarkable.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Michael Levin, “Bioelectric Mechanisms in Regeneration: Unique Aspects and Future Perspectives,” Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology 20 (July 2009): 543–56, doi:10.1016/j.semcdb.2009.04.013.
    2. Sara Imari Walker and Paul C. W. Davies, “The Algorithmic Origins of Life,” Journal of the Royal Society Interface 10 (February 2013): doi:10.1098/rsif.2012.0869.
    3. One of my daughters was a competitive cheerleader. Before she started, if you would have asked me, “Are cheerleaders athletes?” I would have laughed. But after spending several years around cheerleaders, I am truly impressed with their athleticism. In short, cheerleaders are amazing athletes.
  • Earwax Discovery Gives New Hearing to the Case for Intelligent Design

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Feb 22, 2017

    If you are like most people, you probably haven’t devoted much thought to earwax, unless it relates to the safest way to clean it out of your ears.

    But earwax is worth thinking about, because it is a remarkable substance with extraordinary properties, as recent work by engineers from Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) attests.1 In fact, the GIT researchers think that they can use their new insight about earwax to develop specialized filters for electronic devices that must perform in dusty environments.

    By using earwax as an inspiration for new technology, these researchers have unwittingly provided more evidence for intelligent design, while at the same time raising a powerful challenge to the evolutionary explanation for the history and the design of life.

    What Is Earwax?

    This substance is an eclectic mixture of fatty acids, fatty alcohols, cholesterol, and squalene formed from secretions of the sebaceous and the ceruminous glands that line the outer portion of the ear canal. Earwax also consists of shed epithelial cells and hair.

    Earwax is produced by all mammals, including humans. Two different types of earwax are found in humans, referred to as wet and dry. Honey brown in color, wet earwax contains a higher concentration of lipids and pigments than dry earwax. A single genetic change converts wet earwax (which is the genetically dominant form) into dry earwax (the genetically recessive form), which is gray and flaky.

    The type of earwax a person has reflects their ancestry, with people of African and European descent having the wet variety and Asian and Native American people groups having dry earwax. Anthropologists have noted a correlation between earwax type and body odor. People with wet earwax tend to be more odiferous than people with dry earwax. Anthropologists think this correlation reflects sweat production levels, with people with wet earwax sweating more profusely than people with dry earwax. Presumably, the mutation which alters the color and consistency of the earwax also impacts sweat production. Anthropologists think that reduced sweating may have offered an advantage to Asian peoples and Native Americans, and consequently, dry earwax became fixed within these populations.

    What Is the Function of Earwax?

    Earwax serves several functions. One is protecting the inner ear from water, dust particles, and microorganisms. Even though earwax is a solid substance, it allows air to flow through it to the inner ear. Yet, the high fat content of earwax makes it an ideal water repellent, keeping water away from the inner ear. The hair fibers in earwax serve a useful function, forming a meshwork that traps dust particles. And the acidic pH of earwax and the lysosomes from the cellular debris associated with it impart this waxy secretion with antibacterial and antifungal properties.

    The fatty materials associated with earwax also help lubricate the skin of the inner ear canal as the earwax moves toward the outer ear. Earwax motion occurs via a conveyor action set up, in part, by the migration of epithelial cells toward the outer ear. These migrating cells, which move at about the same rate as fingernails grow, carry the earwax along with them. Jaw motion also helps with the earwax movement.

    By comparing earwax from several animals and by video recording earwax in human ear canals, the GIT researchers discovered that earwax has special properties that make it a non-Newtonian fluid. It is solid at rest, but flows when under pressure. Apparently, the pressure exerted on the earwax from jaw movements helps it to flow toward the outer ear. This movement serves as a cleaning mechanism, carrying the debris picked up by the earwax toward the outer ear. Interestingly, the particles picked up by the earwax alter its consistency, from a waxy material, to a flaky solid that readily crumbles, making it easier to clear the outer ear, while making room for newer, cleaner earwax.

    New Technology Inspired by Earwax

    The GIT engineers recognized that, based on its physical properties, earwax could serve as an inspiration for the design of new types of filters that could protect electronics from water and dusty environments. With a bit of imagination, it is possible to conceive of ways to take advantage of shear-thinning behavior to design filters that could be readily replaced with cleaner ones, once they have trapped their limit of dust particles.

    Biomimetics, Bioinspiration, and the Case for Intelligent Design

    It has become rather commonplace for engineers to employ insights from biology to solve engineering problems and to inspire the invention of new technologies. This activity falls under the domain of two relatively new and exciting areas of engineering known as biomimetics and bioinspiration. As the names imply, biomimetics involves direct copying (or mimicry) of designs from biology, whereas bioinspiration relies on insights from biology to guide the engineering enterprise.

    From my perspective, the use of biological designs to guide engineering efforts seems fundamentally at odds with evolutionary theory. Generally, evolutionary biologists view biological systems as the products of an unguided, historically contingent process that co-opts preexisting systems to cobble together new ones. Evolutionary mechanisms can optimize these systems, but they are still kludges, in essence.

    Given the unguided nature of evolutionary mechanisms, does it make sense for engineers to rely on biological systems to solve problems and inspire new technologies? Is it in alignment with evolutionary beliefs to build an entire subdiscipline of engineering upon mimicking biological designs? I would argue that these engineering subdisciplines do not fit with the evolutionary paradigm. On the other hand, biomimetics and bioinspiration naturally flow out of a creation model approach to biology. Using designs in nature to inspire engineering only makes sense if these designs arose from an intelligent Mind.

    Resources

    Engineers’ Muse: The Design of Biochemical Systems” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Beetles Inspire an Engineering Breakthrough” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, “The Technological Potential of Earwax,” Science News (blog), ScienceDaily, January 6, 2017, www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/17016092506.htm.
  • Recent Insights into Morning Sickness Bring Up New Evidence for Design

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Feb 15, 2017

    “A woman giving birth to a child has pain because her time has come; but when her baby is born she forgets the anguish because of her joy that a child is born into the world.”
    –John 16:21

    There is no end to a mother’s love. Most willingly sacrifice and even suffer for their children’s sake. And for many women, this suffering starts in the early days of their pregnancies.

    Somewhere between 50% to 70% of women experience morning sickness—nausea, vomiting, and disgust toward certain foods—beginning near the onset of their pregnancies, and continuing for 2 to 3 months into the second trimester.

    Interestingly, no other mammal experiences morning sickness. It is a uniquely human trait. This has prompted anthropologists and biomedical scientists to ask, why does morning sickness only occur in humans?

    What Causes Morning Sickness?

    As Christians, it might be tempting to view morning sickness as part of the curse—the increased pain in childbirth—described in Genesis 3:16–17.

    Many anthropologists think that it is an epiphenomenon—a nonfunctional byproduct of humanity’s evolutionary origin. These scientists argue that morning sickness results from the genetic incompatibility between the mother and fetus that leads to a conflict for resources, causing the mother to become ill.

    But, in recent years, scientists have identified another explanation for morning sickness, dubbed the prophylaxis hypothesis. They view nausea, vomiting, and disgust toward certain foods as a protective mechanism that keeps both mother and fetus healthy during the initial critical phase of embryonic development.

    Recent work provides new support for this hypothesis,1 and, along with it, gives added insight to the biblical idea that as human beings we are fearfully and wonderfully made (Psalm 139:14). Support for the prophylaxis hypothesis also has pro-life implications.

    What Is the Purpose of Morning Sickness?

    The prophylaxis hypothesis gains support from several observations. First, there are correlations between morning sickness and both reduced incidences of miscarriages and elevated birth weights.

    As it turns out, only certain foods trigger nausea and vomiting and serve as the objects of disgust during the first trimester of pregnancy: namely, meats, poultry, eggs, strongly flavored vegetables, and some fruit. These foods are the most likely to harbor pathogens and dietary toxins that can interfere with embryological development (teratogens). Along these lines, it is interesting that the incidence of morning sickness varies from culture to culture, most likely because of dietary differences.

    The timing of morning sickness also supports the prophylaxis hypothesis. During the first trimester, the mother’s immune system is suppressed. The genetic differences between mother and fetus makes this suppression necessary. Because the fetus is only 50% genetically identical to the mother, her body treats the fetus as foreign and would otherwise attack it, if it wasn’t for the suppression of her immune system.

    Immunosuppression is maximal during the first trimester, leaving both the mother and fetus vulnerable to infection. By the second trimester, the mother’s immunosuppression becomes localized to the interface between the mother and fetus. It is during this time that the developing child’s immune system begins to form. The fetus also enjoys protection from the mother’s antibodies that are transferred to the fetus via the placenta.

    The first trimester is also critical because this is when organ development begins in the fetus. At this juncture in development, the fetus is highly vulnerable to infectious agents and reproductive toxins found in fruits and vegetables.

    There is also another role that morning sickness and disgust toward certain foods play in the early stages of pregnancy: calorie restriction for the mother. It is counterintuitive, but limiting the caloric intake benefits the pregnancy by inhibiting tissue synthesis in the mother. When calories are few, anabolic pathways shut down. This allows nutrients to be devoted to placental formation.

    Why Does Morning Sickness Only Occur in Humans?

    Researchers think that morning sickness in humans stems from our wide-ranging diet. Most mammals have highly specialized diets. Because of this, their immune systems can readily target the pathogens most likely to be found in the foods they eat. They can also make use of specialized enzymes to detoxify the teratogens most likely to be found in the foods they eat. This type of specialized protection isn’t feasible in humans, in fact, it might not even be possible at all, because our diets are so wide-ranging—varying from region to region around the world. Unlike most mammal species, humans literally occupy every corner of the planet. And this capability requires us to eat all sorts of foods. Given our highly varied diet, the most efficient and effective way to protect the mother and fetus during the first trimester of pregnancy is through nausea, vomiting, and disgust toward potentially harmful foods—unpleasant as these experiences might be.

    Morning Sickness as Evidence for the Christian Faith

    Though some biologists have argued that morning sickness is an epiphenomenon that emerged as the byproduct of human evolution, the data indicates otherwise. Morning sickness and disgust toward certain foods plays a critical function in an healthy pregnancy by protecting both the mother and the developing child. As a Christian, I see morning sickness as one more elegantly designed facet of human pregnancy.

    I also see it as affirming key passages of Scripture. Instead of seeing morning sickness as support for Genesis 3:16–17, I view it as deepening the meaning of passages in Psalm 139 describing each of us as being fearfully and wonderfully made. This latest insight about the benefit of morning sickness also expands my perspective of the idea from Psalm 139 that God has knit each of us together in our mother’s womb.

    I also see this insight relating to the command God gave us in Genesis 1 to multiply and fill the earth. To do so would require that we would be able to thrive in a wide range of habitats, demanding that we are capable of consuming a highly varied diet. And of course, this is where morning sickness plays a vital role. For humans to increase in number, while we fill the world, requires a prophylactic mechanism (such as morning sickness) to ensure healthy pregnancies.

    On a side note: The prophylaxis hypothesis also points to human exceptionalism. In contrast to our the highly varied diets, Neanderthals consumed a much more limited range of food. In fact, these differences in dietary practices likely reflect differences in the cognitive capacities of modern humans and Neanderthals. It is no accident that Neanderthals had a limited biogeographical distribution, confined to Europe, Western Asia, and the Middle East. In fact, Neanderthals’ limited diet may well have contributed to their extinction.

    Pro-Life Implications

    This work also has implications for the pro-life debate. I have often heard pro-choice advocates argue that abortion is not murder because the fetus is like a tumor. However, the latest insights into morning sickness undermine this position. This argument would gain validity if morning sickness was, indeed, an epiphenomenon, resulting from a tug-of-war between mother and fetus. But the data says otherwise. Even though the fetus is genetically distinct from the mother, the mother’s body is designed to do everything it can to protect the fetus, including develop morning sickness and disgust toward potentially harmful foods.

    Though this latest understanding about morning sickness may make evolutionary biologists and pro-choice advocates sick, it spews forth new evidence for design. (Sorry, I couldn’t resist.)

    Resources

    What Are the Odds of You Being You?” by Matthew McClure (article)
    Placenta Optimization Shows Creator’s Handiwork” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Curvaceous Anatomy of Female Spine Reveals Ingenious Obstetric Design” by Virgil Robertson (article)
    Does the Childbirth Process Represent Clumsy Evolution or Good Engineering?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    The Female Brain: Pregnant with Design” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Dietary Differences Separate Humans from Neanderthals” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Rachel R. Huxley, “Nausea and Vomiting in Early Pregnancy: Its Role in Placental Development,” Obstetrics and Gynecology 95 (May 2000): 779–82, doi:10.1016/S0029-7844(99)00662-6; Daniel M. T. Fessler, Serena J. Eng, and C. David Navarrete, “Elevated Disgust Sensitivity in the First Trimester of Pregnancy: Evidence Supporting the Compensatory Prophylaxis Hypothesis,” Evolution and Human Behavior 26 (July 2005): 344–51, doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2004.12.001; Samuel M. Flaxman and Paul W. Sherman, “Morning Sickness: Adaptive Cause or Nonadaptive Consequence of Embryo Viability?” The American Naturalist 172 (July 2008): 54–62, doi:10.1086/588081.
  • Were Neanderthals People, Too? A Response to Jon Mooallem

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Feb 08, 2017

    Recently, I conducted an informal survey through my Facebook page, asking my friends, “What do you think is the most significant scientific challenge to the Christian faith?”

    The most consistent concern related to Neanderthals. Why did God create these creatures (and other hominids)? How do we make sense of human-Neanderthal interbreeding? What about Neanderthal behavior? Didn’t these creatures behave just like us?

    These questions are understandable. And they are reinforced by popular science articles such as the piece by Jon Mooallem published recently (January 11, 2017) in the New York Times Magazine. In this piece, Mooallem interviews paleoanthropologist Clive Finlayson about his research at Gorham’s Cave (Gibraltar)—work that Finlayson claims provides evidence that Neanderthals possessed advanced cognitive abilities, just like modern humans—just like us.1

    Finlayson’s team discovered hatch marks made in the bedrock of Gorham’s Cave. They age-date the markings to be more than 39,000 years old. The layer immediately above the bedrock dated between 30,000 and 38,000 years old and contained Neanderthal-produced artifacts, leading the team to conclude that these hominids made the markings, and the hatch marks represent some form of proto-art.2

    In his piece, Mooallem cites other recent scientific claims that support Finlayson’s interpretation of Neanderthal behavioral capacity. Based on archaeological and fossil finds, some paleoanthropologists argue that these hominids: (1) buried their dead, (2) made specialized tools, (3) used ochre, (4) produced jewelry, and (5) even had language capacities.

    This view of Neanderthals stands as a direct challenge to the view espoused by the RTB human origins model, specifically the notion of human exceptionalism and the biblical view that humans alone bear the image of God.

    Mooallem argues that paleoanthropologists have been slow to acknowledge the sophisticated behavior of Neanderthals because of a bias that reflects the earliest views about these creatures—a view that regards these hominids as “unintelligent brutes.” Accordingly, this view has colored the way paleoanthropologists interpret archaeological finds associated with Neanderthals, keeping them from seeing the obvious: Neanderthals had sophisticated cognitive abilities. In fact, Mooallem accuses paleoanthropologists who continue to reject this new view of Neanderthals as being “modern human supremacists,” guilty of speciesism, born out of an “anti-Neanderthal prejudice.”

    Mooallem offers a reason why this prejudice continues to persist among some paleoanthropologists. In part, it’s because of the limited data available to them from the archaeological record. In the absence of a robust data set, paleoanthropologists must rely on speculation fueled by preconceptions. Mooallem states,

    “All sciences operate by trying to fit new data into existing theories. And this particular science, for which the ‘data’ has always consisted of scant and somewhat inscrutable bits of rock and fossil, often has to lean on those meta-narratives even more heavily. . . . Ultimately, a bottomless relativism can creep in: tenuous interpretations held up by webs of other interpretations, each strung from still more interpretations. Almost every archaeologist I interviewed complained that the field has become ‘overinterpreted’—that the ratio of physical evidence to speculation about that evidence is out of whack. Good stories can generate their own momentum.”3

    Yet, as discussed in my book Who Was Adam? (and articles listed below in the Resources section), careful examination of the archaeological and fossil evidence reveals just how speculative the claims about Neanderthal “exceptionalism” are. Could it be that the claims of Neanderthal art and religion result from an overinterpreted archaeological record, and not the other way around?

    In effect, Mooallem’s critique of the “modern human supremacists” cuts both ways. In light of the limited and incomplete data from the archaeological record, it could be inferred that paleoanthropologists who claim Neanderthals have sophisticated cognitive capacities, just like modern humans, have their own prejudices fueled by an “anti-modern human bias” and a speciesism all their own—a bias that seeks to undermine the uniqueness and exceptionalism of modern humans. And to do this they must make Neanderthals out to be just like us.

    As to the question: Why did God create these creatures (and the other hominids)? That will have to wait for another post. So stay tuned…

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Jon Mooallem, “Neanderthals Were People, Too,” New York Times Magazine, January 11, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/11/magazine/neanderthals-were-people-too.html.
    2. Joaquín Rodríguez-Vidal et al., “A Rock Engraving Made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 111 (September 2014): 13301–6, doi:10.1073/pnas.1411529111.
    3. Mooallem, “Neanderthals Were People.”
  • Q&A: Why Would a Limitless Creator Face Trade-Offs in Biochemical Designs?

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Feb 01, 2017

    “Biologists must constantly keep in mind that what they see was not designed, but rather evolved.”
    —Francis Crick, What Mad Pursuit

    In my experience, no one denies the complexity and sophistication of biochemical systems, regardless of their philosophical or religious views. To put it another way, there is no debate. Biochemical systems have the indisputable appearance of design. The question at the center of the creation/evolution controversy relates to the source of the design. Is it the handiwork of a Creator? Or, is it the product of unguided, evolutionary processes? Is the design authentic? Or is it only apparent?

    As a creationist, I regard the elegant designs of biochemical systems as evidence for a Creator’s role in bringing life into existence. Yet, many in the scientific community would disagree, maintaining that the design emerges through evolutionary processes. In support of this position, these detractors point to so-called “bad” biochemical designs and argue that if an all-powerful, all-knowing, all-good Creator produced biochemical systems, these systems should display perfection. On the other hand, less-than-optimal designs are precisely what one would expect if life resulted from an evolutionary history.

    Are Bad Designs a Challenge to the Design Argument?

    In my book The Cell’s Design, I offer a chapter-length rejoinder to this challenge, pointing out the following:

    • Often when life scientists interpret biochemical systems as poorly designed, their view is based on an incomplete understanding of the structure and function of these systems. Inevitably, as researchers develop new insight, these systems are revealed to be additional examples of the elegant designs, characteristic of biochemistry.

    Junk DNA serves as the quintessential illustration of this point.

    • In some cases, biochemical systems labeled as flawed designs are suboptimal in reality. Their suboptimal nature is necessary for the overall system to optimally perform. Routinely, engineers intentionally suboptimize facets of the systems they design to achieve overall optimality. This practice is necessary for complex systems built to achieve multiple objectives. Inevitably, some of these objectives conflict with others. In other words, these systems face trade-offs. To manage the trade-offs, engineers must carefully suboptimize the performances of the systems’ components, again, so that the systems will result in overall optimal performances.

    Some recently discovered examples of biochemical trade-offs include:

    A Rejoinder

    After recently posting the article I wrote on the trade-offs associated with glucose breakdown, my Facebook friend Riaz, a skeptic, offered this come back:

    “There is no need for trade-offs if one has unlimited resources . . . not to mention being able to change [the] law[s] of physics and design/re-design the universe from scratch . . .”

    Trade-Offs Are Inevitable

    This is a reasonable question. Why would the Creator, described in the Bible, ever deal with trade-offs? But what if the God of the Bible did choose to produce a universe with fixed natural laws? If he did, trade-offs inevitably result. And, I contend, the elegance in which these trade-offs are managed in biochemical systems are nothing less than genius, befitting the God of the Bible.

    A Follow-Up Question

    What about Riaz’s second question? Why create a universe with unvarying natural laws, if that means suboptimal designs would necessarily result? If the Creator is infinite in power and extent, if the Creator is all-knowing and all-good, why would He confine himself so that He is forced to suboptimize even a single facet of His creation because of trade-offs?

    Interesting questions, to be sure. From my perspective, there are at least three reasons why God created the universe with unvarying natural laws.

    Constant Laws of Nature Reflect God’s Nature

    A universe with constant natural laws reflects God’s character and nature as revealed in the Old and New Testaments. Scripture teaches that:

    It is reasonable to think that the universe made by a God who does not waver would be governed by unvarying natural laws.

    Along those lines, Psalm 50:6 tells us that the “heavens declare God’s righteousness.” From my vantage point, the righteousness revealed in the heavens would be most clearly manifested through the conformity of the heavenly bodies (and all of nature, for that matter) to constant laws.

    An interesting interplay of these ideas is found in Jeremiah 33:25. Here, the Lord compares the certainty of the covenant He established with His people to the “established laws of heaven and earth.”1 To put it another way, if we ever wonder if God will keep his promises, all we need to do is look to the constancy of the laws of nature.

    Constant Laws of Nature Are Necessary for Moral Accountability

    This assertion may not seem obvious at first glance. But, careful consideration leads to the conclusion that apart from a universe with fixed laws governing nature, it is impossible to have moral laws. In his classic work Faith and Reason, the late philosopher Ron Nash writes:

    “The existence of a lawlike and orderly creation is a necessary condition for a number of divine objectives. . . . it is also reasonable to believe that God placed these free moral agents in a universe exhibiting order. One can hardly act intentionally and responsibly in an unpredictable environment.”2

    Ron Nash goes on to say:

    “If the world were totally unpredictable, if we could never know from one moment to the next, what to expect from nature, both science and meaningful moral conduct would be impossible. While we often take the natural order for granted, this order and the predictability that accompanies it function as a necessary condition for free human action. . . . One reason people can be held accountable when they pull the trigger of a loaded gun is the predictability of what will follow such an action.”3

    Constant Laws of Nature Permit Discoverability

    Unchanging natural laws render the universe (and phenomena within its confines) intelligible. If the laws of nature changed from day-to-day—or at the Creator’s whim—it would be impossible to know anything about the world around us with any real confidence. In effect, science would be impossible. The orderliness of the universe leads to predictability, the most important condition for a rational investigation of the world.

    Because the universe is intelligible, it is possible for human beings to take advantage of God’s provision for us, made available within the creation. As we study and develop an understanding of the laws of physics and chemistry, the composition of matter, and the nature of living systems, we can deploy that knowledge to benefit humanity—in fact, all life on Earth—through technology, agriculture, medicine, and conservation efforts. To put it in theological terms, the intelligibility of the universe allows us to unleash God’s providence for humanity as we come to understand the world around us.

    Ultimately, I believe that God has designed the universe for discoverability because He wants us to see, understand, and appreciate His handiwork as a Creator, so through His creation we can know Him. Scripture teaches that we can glimpse God’s glory (Psalm 19:1), majesty (Psalm 8:1), and righteousness (Psalm 50:6) from nature. From the Old Testament, we learn that God’s eternal nature (Psalm 90:2) can be gleaned from the world around us. We can see God’s love, faithfulness, righteousness, and justice (Psalm 36:5–6) in creation. This powerful revelation of God’s character is only possible because the laws of nature are constant.

    Scripture (Romans 1:20; Job 12:7–9) also teaches that we can see evidence for God’s fingerprints as well—evidence for His existence. And toward that end, I maintain that we see God’s handiwork in the elegant way trade-offs are handled in biochemical systems.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Jeremiah 33:25–26.
    2. Ronald H. Nash, Faith and Reason: Searching for a Rational Faith (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1988), 200.
    3. Ibid., 201.
  • The Female Brain: Pregnant with Design

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Jan 25, 2017

    When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to her, “Woman, here is your son.”

    –John 19:26

    I’ve learned the hard way: It is best to be circumspect when offering commentary about pregnancy, especially when women are around.

    So, it’s with some hesitation I bring up the latest scientific insight developed by a team of researchers from Spain. These investigators discovered that pregnancy alters a woman’s brain. In fact, pregnancy reduces her grey matter.1 (Okay Fuz. Hold your tongue. Don’t say what you’re thinking.)

    But, as it turns out, the loss of grey matter is a good thing. In fact, it reveals the elegant design of the human brain and adds to the growing evidence of human exceptionalism. This scientific advance also has implications for the pro-life movement.

    The Spanish research team was motivated to study brain changes in pregnant women because of the effects that sex hormones have on adolescent brains. During this time, sex hormones cause extensive reorganization of the brain. This process is a necessary part of the neural maturation process. The researchers posited that changes to the female brain should take place, because of the surge of sex hormones during pregnancy. While pregnant, women are exposed to 10 to 15 times the normal progesterone levels. During nine months of pregnancy, women are also subjected to more estrogen than the rest of their life when not pregnant.

    To characterize the effect of pregnancy on brain structure, the research team employed a prospective study design. They imaged the brains of women who wanted to become pregnant for the first time. Then, they imaged the brains of the subjects once the women had given birth. Finally, they imaged the brains of the subjects two years after birth, if they didn’t become pregnant again. As controls, they imaged the brains of women who had never been pregnant and the brains of the fathers.

    The Effects of Pregnancy on Women’s Brains

    While the brain’s white matter is unaffected, the researchers found that pregnancy leads to a loss of grey matter that, minimally, lasts up to two years. They also discovered that the grey matter loss was not random or arbitrary. Instead, it occurred in highly specific areas of the brain. In fact, the grey matter loss was so consistent from subject to subject that the researchers could tell if a woman was pregnant or not from brain images alone.

    As it turns out, the area of the brain that loses grey matter is the region involved in social cognition that harbors the theory-of-mind neural network. This network allows human beings to display a quality anthropologists call theory of mind. Along with symbolism, our theory-of-mind capacity makes us unique compared to other animals, providing scientific justification for the idea of human exceptionalism. As human beings, we recognize that other humans possess a mind like ours. Because of that recognition, we can anticipate what others are thinking and feeling. Our theory-of-mind capability makes possible complex social interactions characteristic of our species.

    Even though the pregnant women lost grey matter, they showed no loss of memory or cognitive ability. The researchers believe that the loss of grey matter stems from synaptic pruning. This process occurs in adolescents and is a vital part of brain development and maturation. Through the loss of grey matter, neural networks form. The research team posits that synaptic pruning in pregnant women establishes a neural network that plays a role in the deep attachment mothers have with their children. This attachment helps mothers anticipate their babies’ needs. The deep social connection between mother and child is critical for human survival, because human infants are so vulnerable at birth and have a prolonged childhood.

    In support of this proposal, the researchers found that when they showed the pregnant women pictures of their babies, the brain areas that lost grey matter became active. On the other hand, they saw no corresponding brain activity when the mothers were shown pictures of other babies.

    The Case for Human Exceptionalism Mounts

    This work highlights the elegant design of human pregnancy and child rearing—features that I take as evidence for a Creator’s handiwork. It is nothing short of brilliant to have the surge of sex hormones during pregnancy, priming the brain to ensure a close attachment between mother and child, at the time of birth and throughout the first few years of childhood.

    More importantly, this work adds to the mounting scientific evidence for human exceptionalism. Not only do humans uniquely possess theory of mind, but our theory-of-mind neural network is more complex and sophisticated than previously thought. It is remarkable that this neural network can be adapted and fine-tuned to ensure an intimate mother-infant attachment while maintaining relationships in the midst of complex social surroundings, typical of human interactions.

    As an interesting side note: Recent research indicates that for Neanderthals, the area of their brain devoted to maintaining social interactions was much smaller than the corresponding area in modern humans, highlighting our unique and exceptional nature even when compared to the hominids found in the fossil record.2

    Pro-Life Implications

    In my view, this work also has pro-life implications. I frequently hear pro-choice advocates argue that the fetus is a mass of tissue, just like a tumor. But, this study undermines this view. It is hard to think of a fetus as being just a lump of tissue, when such a sophisticated system is in place during pregnancy to form a neural network (that is, a subset of the theory-of-mind network) in the mother’s brain that generates the special capacity of the mother to bond with the fetus at birth.

    It also raises concerns for the health of women who receive abortions. Though speculative, one has to wonder what effect prematurely terminating a pregnancy has on women whose brains have become fine-tuned to bond to the very infants that are destroyed by the abortion.

    Resources

    Placenta Optimization Shows Creator’s Handiwork by Fazale Rana (article)
    Curvaceous Anatomy of the Female Spine Reveals Ingenious Obstetric Designby Virgil Robertson (article)
    Does the Childbirth Process Represent Clumsy Evolution or Good Engineering?by Fazale Rana (article)
    Neanderthal Brains Make Them Unlikely Social Networkersby Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Elseline Hoekzema et al., “Pregnancy Leads to Long-Lasting Changes in Human Brain Structure,” Nature Neuroscience, published electronically December 19, 2016, doi:10.1038/nn.4458.
    2. Eiluned Pearce, Chris Stringer, and R. I. M. Dunbar, “New Insights into Differences in Brain Organization between Neanderthals and Anatomically Modern Humans,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B 280 (May 2013): doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.0168.
  • Does Dinosaur Tissue Challenge Evolutionary Timescales? A Response to Kevin Anderson, Part 2

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Jan 18, 2017

    What is the proper relationship between science and the Christian faith? Answering that question can be complicated, involving an interplay between science, philosophy, theology, and biblical studies. Perhaps it’s not surprising that evangelical Christians (who all take Scripture seriously) advocate disparate models, weighing differently the data and insights from science and Scripture.

    The three most prominent views held by evangelical Christians are: young-earth creationism (YEC), old-earth creationism (OEC), and evolutionary creationism (EC). Each view has strengths and weaknesses. And each view accepts and rejects (or at least expresses skepticism) about certain aspects of current scientific paradigms.

    It goes without saying that “in-house” discussions among adherents of these three models can become quite contentious. And for good reason: much is at stake. No one wants to undermine Scripture. And no one wants to recklessly disregard scientifically established ideas. Because to do so could compromise the Church’s ability to reach out to non-Christians. In my view, it is okay to question scientific dogma—particularly if it challenges key tenets of the Christian faith. But it is important to do so responsibly and in a scientifically credible way.

    My chief motivation for writing Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth was to prevent well-intentioned Christians from unwittingly undercutting their effectiveness when sharing their faith by using a seemingly compelling scientific argument for a young Earth (with the hope of demonstrating the credibility of the creation accounts from a young-Earth vantage point).

    Many Christians regard the discovery of soft-tissue remnants, associated with fossilized remains age-dated to be upwards of hundreds of millions of years, as a compelling scientific evidence for a young Earth. And I can see why.

    Soft tissues shouldn’t survive for millions of years. Based on common wisdom, these materials should readily degrade in a few thousand years. That being the case, the discovery of soft tissue remnants associated with fossils is a compelling reason to question the reliability of radiometric dating methods used to determine the age of these fossils, and along with it, Earth’s antiquity. Instead, YECs argue that these discoveries provide powerful scientific evidence for a young Earth and support the idea that the fossil record results from a recent global (worldwide) flood.

    Yet few scientifically minded people are swayed by this argument. In Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I explain why this increasingly prominent argument for a young Earth is invalid. First, I explain why radiometric dating methods are reliable. Secondly, I explain how it is scientifically conceivable that soft-tissue remnants could survive for upwards of hundreds of millions of years.

    When I published Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I expected responses by YECs. And there have been a few. Generally, I won’t engage in tit-for-tat when my ideas are criticized. But, I am making an exception in the case of Kevin Anderson’s recent technically rigorous article for Answers in Depth, the journal of Answers in Genesis, titled: “Dinosaur Tissue: A Biochemical Challenge to the Evolutionary Timescale.” Because Anderson is a scholar, and because his approach is fair-minded, it is important to pay attention to his critiques of my work and to engage his ideas.

    In part one (of this two-part blog series), I addressed Anderson’s dismissal of the biomolecular durability argument I present in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth as part of the explanation for collagen (and keratin) survivability in fossils. In this second part, I engage Anderson’s challenges to what he refers to as “the most popular explanation for prolonged preservation” of soft tissue. Namely, the “iron model.”1

    The Iron Model for Soft Tissue Preservation

    As described in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, paleontologists have noted iron deposits associated with preserved soft-tissue remnants in a number of fossilized specimens. (In fact, iron deposits were associated with the recently discovered dinosaur feathers preserved in amber, age-dated to 99 million years.2) On this basis, they speculate that the iron in conjunction with oxygen help to preserve soft-tissue materials through a variety of possible mechanisms, including: killing off microbes, inhibiting enzymes, and causing cross-linking reactions that function as a fixative (like formaldehyde), at least until mineral entombment takes place.3 The researchers posit that iron associated with hemoglobin (the protein that binds and carries oxygen found in red blood cells) is the primary source of iron. Presumably, when the organism dies, the red blood cells lyse, releasing hemoglobin and iron into the tissue.

    To demonstrate the validity of this idea, researchers from North Carolina State University exposed ostrich blood vessels dispersed in an aqueous solution of ruptured blood cells. They observed iron deposits forming on the blood vessels. The blood cell lysate stabilized the soft tissue. Compared to blood vessels dispersed in water (in the presence and absence of oxygen) which lasted only a few days, blood vessels exposed to red blood lysates persisted for upwards of two years (and counting).

    Yet, Anderson questions the iron model for a variety of reasons.

    • He raises doubts about the relevancy of the laboratory experiments on the ostrich blood vessels.
    • He expresses concern that the iron level in dinosaurs is insufficient for it to achieve adequate preservation, even if the iron model is valid.
    • He notes that the reactions that promote cross-linking also destroys amino acids. (Even though amino acids have been recovered from dinosaur and bird fossils.)

    In my view, none of these criticisms bears much weight.

    To be fair, Anderson rightly highlights a problem constantly confronting scientists studying the origin and history of life. Namely, how do chemical and physical processes identified in the laboratory under highly controlled conditions (and the auspices of researchers) translate to the uncontrolled conditions of Earth’s past environment? Though granting Anderson this point—in fact, I have raised a similar criticism toward work in prebiotic chemistry in my book Creating Life in the Lab—it is important to acknowledge that the stability experiments with ostrich blood vessels demonstrate that, in principle, the iron model has merit. It is also worth noting that the conditions employed by the researchers in the lab experiments represent a worst-case scenario, because the vessels were dispersed in water which promotes hydrolysis and microbial growth. In other words, under “real-life” conditions, iron-mediated preservation of soft tissue has an even greater likelihood than in the experiments conducted in the laboratory.

    Concerning Anderson’s second point about iron abundances in dinosaurs (or ancient birds), it is noteworthy that iron from the lysed red blood cells binds to the ostrich blood vessels, suggesting some type of concentrating mechanism that localizes the iron to the soft tissue. Also, as Anderson acknowledges, there may be environmental sources of iron that could contribute to the iron pool. Even if there are still questions as to the source and available levels of iron for tissue preservation, this mechanism appears to be significant. As already noted, paleontologists have discovered iron associated with soft tissue remnants found in fossils.

    As for Anderson’s third point, it is true that the reaction mediated by iron and oxygen (which drives cross-linking) alters amino acids. And it is true that unaltered amino acids are found in the fossil specimens. But these two results are not mutually exclusive. How is that possible? Because chemical reactions don'[t necessarily go to completion. To put it another way, during the preservation process, it is unlikely that all the amino acids comprising dinosaur proteins reacted via the iron and oxygen mediated reactions. Some of the amino acids will remain unaltered—even highly reactive ones. It is noteworthy that the molecular profiles of materials extracted from dinosaur fossils show a relative dearth of less stable amino acids and an abundance of more durable amino acids, exactly as expected if the amino acids come from the remnants of ancient protein specimens.4

    Ultimately, my complaint with Anderson’s critiques have less to do with his scientific points, and more to do with his “either-or” posture. Even if Anderson’s critique of the iron model stands, it doesn’t mean that there is no way to account for soft-tissue preservation. As I argue in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, there is probably no single preservation mechanism that accounts for the survival of soft tissue materials. In reality, it is a combination of mechanisms working additively (maybe, synergistically) that accounts for the persistence of soft tissue in fossils, with the iron-oxygen mechanism working in conjunction with other processes.

    Other Preservation Mechanisms

    In Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I argue that many of the mechanisms that affect soft-tissue decomposition (hydrolysis via exposure to water, oxidation caused by oxygen exposure, breakdown by environmental enzymes, and microbial decomposition) can actually protect soft-tissue remnants under some circumstances.

    In response to this point, Anderson argues that these claims are “self-contradictory.”5 But this is exactly my point. Conditions traditionally thought to drive soft-tissue breakdown, preserve soft tissues under certain sets of conditions. In other words, traditional views about soft-tissue decomposition aren’t likely correct.

    In fact, the iron model illustrates this point. In keeping with common wisdom, exposure to oxygen drives soft-tissue destruction. Conversely, excluding oxygen during the fossilization process should aid in preservation by preventing oxidative decomposition of the soft-tissue materials. But oxidation reactions also drive cross-linking of proteins. So, exposure to oxygen also preserves soft tissues. Whether decomposition or preservation occurs depends on the specific circumstances surrounding the fossilization process, with some conditions “tipping the scale” in favor of decomposition and other conditions “moving the needle” toward preservation. And, of course, iron released from hemoglobin (or from environmental sources) accelerates the cross-linking reactions, helping to stabilize the soft-tissue materials.

    Are Fossils Thousands of Years Old or Millions of Years Old?

    Anderson concludes his argument by lamenting the bias of the scientific community. He says, “The problem is that the evolutionary community does not really consider the first alternative [dinosaurs aren’t as old as we think they are] as a possibility. Thus, it really is not an ‘either/or’ option. In their view the fossils must be old, therefore the tissue must somehow have survived (biochemical contradictions not withstanding). . . . No one has ever observed multi-millions of years of animal tissue preservation. The only reason there is even a quest for an unknown preservation mechanism is because evolutionary assumptions require dinosaur fossils to be at least 65 million years old.”6

    Anderson’s protests not withstanding, the scientific community does not assume the fossils to be millions of years old, but has measured fossils to be millions of years old using sound, scientifically established radiometric methods. Consequently, the scientific community has observed soft tissue preserved for millions of years, with the recovery of blood vessels remnants, and protein fragments from the fossils of dinosaurs (and other organisms).

    Finally, while it is true that the scientific community lacks full understanding of the mechanisms involved, preservation of soft tissues in fossils does not stand as a “biochemical contradiction.” Instead, there are sound explanations for the persistence of soft-tissue remnants in fossils. And as work continues, I predict that the scientific community will identify new preservation mechanisms. In fact, this has already happened. Researchers now think that eumelanin released from melanosomes can serve as a fixative assisting in the preservation of keratin associated with fossilized feathers, claws, and skin.7

    I appreciate Kevin Anderson’s thoughtful engagement with my ideas regarding soft-tissue preservation, but I disagree with his conclusions. Simply put, soft-tissue preservation in fossils is not a valid scientific argument for a young Earth, nor does it provide evidence that the fossil record was laid down as a result of a recent, global flood.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Kevin Anderson, “Dinosaur Tissue: A Biochemical Challenge to the Evolutionary Timescale,” Answers in Genesis 11 (2016): https://answersingenesis.org/fossils/dinosaur-tissue/.
    2. Lida Xing et al., “A Feathered Dinosaur Tail with Primitive Plumage Trapped in Mid-Cretaceous Amber,” Current Biology 26 (December 19, 2016): 3352–60, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.008.
    3. Mary Schweitzer et al., “A Role for Iron and Oxygen Chemistry in Preserving Soft Tissues, Cells and Molecules from Deep Time,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B 281 (January 2014): 20132741, doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.2741.
    4. Mary Schweitzer et al., “Preservation of Biomolecules in Cancellous Bone of Tyrannosaurus Rex,Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17 (June 1997): 34959, doi:10.1080/02724634.1997.10010979.
    5. Kevin Anderson, “Dinosaur Tissue.”
    6. Ibid.
    7. Alison Moyer, Wenxia Zheng, and Mary Schweitzer, “Keratin Durability Has Implications for the Fossil Record: Results from a 10 Year Feather Degradation Experiment,” PLoS One 11 (July 2016): e0157699, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0157699.
  • Does Dinosaur Tissue Challenge Evolutionary Timescales? A Response to Kevin Anderson, Part 1

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Jan 11, 2017

    Is there a bona fide scientific challenge to the age of the Earth, which is measured to be 4.5 billion years old? As an old-earth creationist (OEC), I would answer no. But, there has been one scientific argument for a young Earth that has given me some pause for thought: the discovery of soft tissue remnants in the fossilized remains of dinosaurs (and other organisms). Paleontologists have discovered the remnants of blood vessels, red blood cells, bone cells, and protein fragments, such as collagen and keratin, in the fossilized remains of dinosaurs that age-date older than 65 million years.

    These unexpected finds have become central to the case made by young-earth creationists (YEC) for a 6,000-year-old Earth. In effect, the argument goes like this: Soft tissues shouldn’t survive for millions of years. Instead, these materials should readily degrade in a few thousand years. Accordingly, the discovery of soft tissue remnants associated with fossils is a prima facie challenge to the reliability of radiometric dating methods used to determine the age of these fossils, and along with it, Earth’s antiquity. YECs argue that these discoveries provide compelling scientific evidence for a young Earth and support the idea that the fossil record results from a recent global (worldwide) flood.

    As I detail in my book Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, there are good reasons to think that radiometric dating methods are reliable. And, that being the case, then there must be an explanation for soft tissue survival. Despite the claims made by YECs, there are scientific mechanisms that can account for the survival of soft-tissue materials for millions of years, as discussed in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth.

    In response to my book (and other recent challenges) to the soft-tissue argument for a young Earth, YEC Kevin Anderson wrote a piece for Answers in Depth, the journal of Answers in Genesis, titled: “Dinosaur Tissue: A Biochemical Challenge to the Evolutionary Timescale.”

    In this technically rigorous piece, Anderson argues that paleontologists now view soft-tissue remnants associated with the fossilized remains of dinosaur (and other organisms) as commonplace. On this point, Anderson and I would agree. However, Anderson complains that the scientific community ignores the troubling implications of the soft-tissue finds. He states: “Despite a large body of evidence for the authenticity of the tissue, there remains a pattern of denial within the evolutionist community—presumably to downplay the ramifications of this discovery. . . . Apparently many find the soft-tissue evidence much easier to dismiss than to understand and explain. Perhaps this should not be too surprising. The tissue is certainly difficult to account for within the popular geologic timescale.”1

    Yet, in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I explain how soft-tissue remnants associated with fossils are accounted for within “the popular geologic timescale.”

    Soft-Tissue Survival in Fossils

    Once entombed within a mineral encasement (which occurs as the result of the fossilization process), soft-tissue remnants can survive for vast periods of time. The key: the soft tissues must be preserved until entombment happens. In Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I identify several factors that promote soft-tissue preservation during the fossilization process. One relates to the structure of the molecules comprising the soft tissues. Some molecules are much more durable than others, making them much more likely to survive until entombment.

    This durability partially explains the chemical profile of the compounds associated with soft-tissue remnants. For example, paleontologists have uncovered collagen and keratin fragments associated with dinosaur fossils. These finds make sense because these molecules are heavily cross-linked. And they occur at high levels in bones (collagen) and feathers, skin, and claws (keratin). Researchers also believe that iron released from hemoglobin, and eumelanin released from melanosomes associated with feathers, function as fixatives to further stabilize these molecules, delaying their decomposition.

    But What about Measured Collagen Decomposition Rates?

    Kevin Anderson agrees that some molecules, such as collagen, resist rapid degradation. However, he rejects the durability argument I present in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth as part of the explanation for collagen (and keratin) survivability, citing work published in 2011 by researchers from the University of Manchester in the UK.2

    In this study, investigators monitored collagen loss in cattle and human bones at 90 °C (194 °F). Even though this high temperature doesn’t directly apply to the fossilization process, the researchers employed a temperature close to the boiling point of water to gather rate data in a reasonable time frame. Still, it took them about one month to generate the necessary data, even at this high temperature. In turn, they used this data to calculate the bone loss at 10 °C (50 °F), which corresponds to the average temperature of a typical archaeological site in a country such as Great Britain. These calculations made use of the Arrhenius rate equation. This equation allows scientists to calculate the rate for a chemical process (such as the breakdown of collagen) at any temperature, once the rate has been experimentally determined for a single temperature. The only assumption is that the physical and chemical properties of the system (in this case, collagen) are the same as the temperature used to measure the reaction rate and the temperature used to calculate the reaction rate.

    But, as I discuss in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, if the conditions differ, then a phenomenon known as an Arrhenius plot break occurs. This discontinuity makes it impossible to calculate the reaction rate.

    On this basis, I questioned if the data generated by the University of Manchester scientists for collagen breakdown in bone near the boiling point of water is relevant to breakdown rates for temperatures that would be under 100 °F, let alone to temperatures near 50 °F. I speculated that at such high temperatures, the collagen would undergo structural changes (for example, breaking of inter-chain hydrogen bonds that cross-link collagen chains together) making this biomolecule much more susceptible to chemical degradation than at lower temperatures where collagen would remain in its native state. In other words, the conditions employed by the research team from the University of Manchester may not be relevant to collagen preservation in fossil remains.

    Kevin Anderson challenged my claim, stating, “Dr. Rana speculates that high temperatures may unexpectedly alter how collagen will degrade, so perhaps the Arrhenius equation cannot be properly applied. However, he fails to offer any experimental support for his conclusion. If he wants to challenge these decay studies, he needs to provide experimental evidence that collagen decay is somehow an exception to this equation.”3

    Fair enough. Yet, it was relatively easy for me to find the experimental data he requires. A quick literature search produced work published in the early 1970s by a team of researchers from the USDA in Beltsville, MD describing the thermal denaturation profiles of intact collagen from a variety of animal sources.4 The onset temperatures for the denaturation process typically begin near 60 °C (140 °F), reach the mid-point of the denaturation around 70 °C (158 °F), and end around 80 °C (176 °F). In other words, collagen denaturation occurs at temperatures well below the temperatures used by the University of Manchester scientists in their study.

    From the denaturation profiles, these researchers determined that the loss of native structure primarily entails the unraveling of the collagen triple helix. This unraveling would expose the protein backbone, making it much easier to undergo chemical degradation.

    In Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, I discuss another reason why the study results obtained by the University of Manchester scientists don’t contradict the recovery of collagen from 70–80 million-year-old dinosaur remains. In effect, this research team was addressing a different question. Namely, how long can collagen last in animal remains in a form that can be isolated and used as a source of genetic information about the organisms found at archaeological and fossil sites?

    In other words, they weren’t interested in how long chemically and physically altered collagen fragments would persist in fossil remains, but, instead, how long collagen will retain a useful form that can yield insight into the natural history of past organisms. Specifically, they were interested in the survival of “the non-helical collagen telopeptides located at the very ends of each chain and recently considered potentially useful for species identification in archaeological tissues.”5

    The researchers lament that this region of the collagen molecules is “lost to the burial environment within a relatively short period of geologic time.”6 As they point out, the parts of the collagen molecule most useful to characterize the natural history of past organisms and their relationships to extant creatures, unfortunately, are “regions of the protein that do not benefit from as many interchain hydrogen bonds as the helical region, and thus will likely be the first to degrade.”7

    The researchers also point out that they expect collagen to persist for much longer than 700,000 years, but in a chemically altered state due to cross-linking reactions and other types of chemical modifications. They state, “Collagen could plausibly be detected at lower concentrations [than 1 percent of the original amounts] in much older material but likely in a diagenetically-altered state and at levels whereby separation from endogenous and exogenous contaminations is much more time-consuming, costly and perhaps applicable only to atypically large taxa that can offer sufficient fossil material for destructive analysis.”8

    In other words, chemically altered forms of collagen will persist in animal remains well beyond a million years, particularly if they are large creatures such as dinosaurs. And this is precisely what paleontologists have discovered associated with dinosaur fossils—fragments of diagentically altered collagen (and keratin).

    But What about Molecular Fragments Derived from Non-Durable Proteins Isolated from Dinosaur Remains?

    Another related challenge raised by Anderson relates to the recovery of molecular fragments of other proteins from dinosaur fossils that are much less durable than collagen. Anderson writes: “Several of these proteins (e.g., myosin, actin, and tropomyosin) are not nearly as structurally ‘tough’ as collagen. . . . Even if there were a biochemical basis that enabled collagen fragments to survive millions of years, this cannot be said about all these other dinosaur proteins.”9

    As I point out in Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth, in addition to molecular durability, there are several other factors that contribute to soft-tissue preservation. One relates to abundance. Biomolecules that occur at high levels in soft tissue will be more likely to leave behind traces in fossilized remains than molecules that occur at relatively low levels.

    Along these lines, collagen and keratin would have been some of the most abundant proteins in dinosaurs and ancient birds, making up connective tissue and feathers, skin, and claws, respectively. Likewise, actin, myosin, and tropomyosin would also have occurred at high levels in dinosaurs and ancient birds, because these proteins are the major components of muscle. So even though these proteins aren’t as durable as collagen or keratin, it still makes sense that fragments of these biomolecules would be associated with dinosaur fossils because of their abundances.

    In short, the durability and abundances of proteins provide a credible explanation for the occurrence of soft-tissue remnants in the fossilized remains of dinosaurs. But these two features don’t fully account for soft-tissue preservation. As it turns out, there are additional factors to consider.

    In his article, Anderson also challenges what he refers to as “the most popular explanation for prolonged preservation” of soft tissue. Namely, the “iron model.”10 In part 2 of my response to Kevin Anderson, I will describe and respond to his critique of the iron model and other preservation mechanisms.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Kevin Anderson, “Dinosaur Tissue: A Biochemical Challenge to the Evolutionary Timescale,” Answers in Genesis 11 (2016): https://answersingenesis.org/fossils/dinosaur-tissue/.
    2. Mike Buckley and Matthew James Collins, “Collagen Survival and Its Use for Species Identification in Holocene-Lower Pleistocene Bone Fragments from British Archaeological and Paleontological Sites,” Antiqua 1 (2011): e1, doi:10.4081/antiqua.2011.e1.
    3. Anderson, “Dinosaur Tissue.”
    4. Philip E. McClain and Eugene R. Wiley, “Differential Scanning Calorimeter Studies of the Thermal Transitions of Collagen: Implications on Structure and Stability,” Journal of Biological Chemistry 247 (February 1972): 692–97, https://www.jbc.org/content/247/3/692.full.pdf.
    5. Buckley and Collins, “Collagen Survival.”
    6. Ibid.
    7. Ibid.
    8. Ibid.
    9. Anderson, “Dinosaur Tissue.
  • Duck-Billed Platypus Venom: Designed for Discovery

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Jan 04, 2017

    I wouldn’t classify it as a bucket-list experience, but it was off-the-charts cool to see a duck-billed platypus up close a few years ago when my wife and I visited Tasmania. This little creature reminded me of a beaver as he swam around in the water.

    But as cute and cuddly as the duck-billed platypus appears to be, I came to learn (not by experience but by listening to the zookeeper) that you don’t want to mess with this egg-laying mammal. The platypus has spurs on its hind feet, and for males, the spurs are loaded with venom. Being struck by a platypus’s spurs is no pleasant thing. The venom can kill a small animal (such as a dog) and cause excruciating pain for humans.

    Not only does the duck-billed platypus fascinate animal lovers, it has captured the attention of the scientific community. This creature is neither a placental nor a marsupial mammal. Instead, it belongs to an unusual group called the monotremes. Biologists regard monotremes as primitive mammals. And because they group apart from other mammals, many life scientists believe that they can learn a lot about the mammalian biology (including human biology) through comparative studies of the monotremes.

    Recently, researchers from Australia demonstrated the value of studying platypus biology when they discovered that a gut hormone (GLP-1) which regulates blood sugar levels doubles as a component in the duck-billed platypus’s venom.1 They believe that this insight may lead to a new drug treatment for type 2 diabetes.

    To appreciate why this research team thinks that the platypus GLP-1 hormone may have use in treating diabetes, a little background is in order.

    GLP-1

    Found in all mammals, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) belongs to a family of biomolecules called incretins. These compounds serve as metabolic hormones that stimulate a decrease in blood glucose levels. Secreted in the gut, GLP-1 ultimately lowers blood sugar levels by making its way through the blood stream to the pancreas. GLP-1 stimulates the beta-cells in the pancreas to release insulin. In turn, insulin causes the liver, muscles, and adipose tissues to take up glucose from the blood.

    GLP-1 is named after glucagon. A blood hormone, glucagon has the opposite effect as insulin. When released by the alpha-cells of the pancreas, glucagon stimulates the liver to break down glycogen and then release glucose into the blood stream. Glucagon exerts its effect when the blood sugar level drops. Like GLP-1, glucagon also stimulates insulin release, so when the blood sugar level rises (because of glucagon’s release from the alpha-cells), the sugar is quickly taken up by muscle and adipose tissues.
    Duckbilled platypus venom

    Image: Insulin and glucagon regulate blood glucose levels in the human anatomy, specifically the liver and pancreas.

    Eating food stimulates the release of GLP-1 in the gut. This ingenious design ensures that insulin is released and the liver, muscles, and fat tissues are poised to take up glucose even before blood sugar levels rise as nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream via the digestion process. This preparation is vital, because elevated levels of blood sugar have dangerous long-term consequences.

    Platypus Venom

    To the surprise of the Australian researchers, the venom of the duck-billed platypus contains GLP-1. Other animals, such as the Gila monster, have venom components that are structurally analogous to GLP-1, but are distinct molecules. (In the Gila monster, this bio-compound is called exendin-4.) Again, an ingenious design. Including incretins in venom causes blood sugar levels to drop after the venom is injected into the victim. Lowered blood sugar levels create confusion and lethargy.

    Unlike GLP-1, GLP-1-like venom components of, say, the Gila monster, are long-lived in the bloodstream because they have structural features that make them resistant to digestive enzymes such as dipeptidyl peptidase. This enzyme targets GLP-1 after its release to ensure it is quickly destroyed once this gut hormone triggers insulin release. If not quickly removed, insulin release would persist, thereby causing blood sugar to plummet to dangerously low levels.

    The structure of the GLP-1 produced by the duck-billed platypus appears to be fine-tuned so that this biomolecule can balance its two roles as a gut hormone and a venom component. And this property makes the platypus GLP-1 an intriguing molecule to biomedical scientists looking for more effective ways to treat type 2 diabetes. The duck-billed platypus GLP-1 is an actual gut hormone (as opposed to an analog), but is much longer lasting, which makes it an ideal anti-diabetic drug.

    Type 2 Diabetes

    The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes results primarily from lifestyle effects: namely, obesity and lack of exercise. (Although there also appears to be a genetic contribution to this form of diabetes.) In type 2 diabetes, the capacity of beta-cells in the pancreas to secrete insulin becomes impaired, usually because of the accumulation of amylose in their interior. Reduced insulin secretion causes blood sugar levels to remain elevated at dangerously high levels. Persistently elevated blood sugar levels can lead to heart disease, stroke, loss of vision, kidney failure, and impaired blood circulation to the extremities.

    Treatment for type 2 diabetes centers around dietary changes designed for keeping blood sugar levels low, weight loss, and increased exercise. Anti-diabetic medications also play an important role in managing type 2 diabetes. Pharmacologists have developed an arsenal of drugs, but all of them have their shortcomings.

    Platypus GLP-1 as an Anti-Diabetic Medication

    Because of the limitations of current anti-diabetic medications, pharmacologists are intrigued by the platypus version of GLP-1. Like all variants found among mammals, this gut hormone lowers blood glucose levels, but because it doubles as a venom component, it has a longer half-life than the GLP-1 hormones produced by other mammals—an ideal set of properties for an anti-diabetic drug. In fact, there is already a precedent for using venom components to treat diabetes. Exendin-4 from the Gila monster has been developed into a last resort anti-diabetic drug called Exenatide.

    The Case for Evolution, the Case for Creation

    It’s provocative that the biology of a creature, such as the duck-billed platypus, could provide such important insight into human biology that it can drive new drug development, positively impacting human health.

    This study highlights the clever designs that characterize biochemical systems. The function of GLP-1 as an incretin and, in turn, its employ as a venom component are nothing less than genius. The elegance and sophistication of biochemical systems are precisely the characteristics I, a Christian biochemist, would expect to see, if, indeed, life stems from a Creator’s handiwork. In contrast, sophistication and ingenuity aren’t the features I would expect if evolutionary mechanisms—which are unguided, co-opting preexisting designs and cobbling them together to produce new designs—have generated biochemical systems.

    Still, many people in the scientific community would argue that as hard as it may be to believe that biochemical systems evolved, it must be the case. Why? Because of the shared features that characterize these systems. As a case in point, the GLP-1 gut hormone is found in all mammals. So, presumably, this biomolecule emerged in the evolutionary ancestor of mammals and persists in all mammals today. Likewise, the shared features of GLP-1 and exendin-4 found in the Gila monster venom indicate to many biologists that the venom component must be evolutionarily derived from GLP-1.

    Yet, as a creationist and an intelligent design proponent, I choose to interpret the universal nature of the cell’s chemistry and shared features of biochemical systems as manifestations of archetypical designs that emanate from the Creator’s mind—inspired by the thinking of Sir Richard Owen. To put it differently, for me, the shared features reflect common design, not common descent.

    Of course, this leads to the follow-up rebuttal: Why would God create using the same template? Why not create each biochemical system from scratch to be ideally suited for its function? As I pointed out recently, there may well be several reasons why a Creator would design living systems around a common set of templates. In my estimation, the most significant reason is discoverability. The shared features of biochemical systems make it possible to apply what we learn by studying one organisms to all others, in some cases. As a case in point: The occurrence of GLP-1 in all mammals and the shared features of GLP-1 and exendin-4 make it possible to gain insight into human biology by studying the duck-billed platypus.

    This discoverability makes it easier to appreciate God’s glory and grandeur, as evinced in biochemical systems by their elegance, sophistication, and ingenuity.

    Discoverability of biochemical systems also reflect God’s providence and care for humanity. If not for the shared features, it would be nearly impossible for us to learn enough about the living realm for our benefit. Where would biomedical science be without the ability to learn fundamental aspects about our biology by studying model organisms such as yeast, fruit flies, and mice? How would it be possible to identify new medications if not for the biochemical similarities between humans and other creatures, such as the duck-billed platypus?

    Far from making no sense, the shared features in biochemistry are a manifestation of the Creator’s care and love for humanity.

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Enkhjargal Tsend-Ayush et al., “Monotreme Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Venom and Gut: One Gene—Two Very Different Functions,” Scientific Reports 6 (November 29, 2016): id. 37744, doi:10.1038/srep37744.
  • Q&A: Why Would an Infinite Creator Employ the Same Designs?

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Dec 21, 2016

    Because I am a Christian, I see evidence for design in the biological realm. But for me, the converse is also true. Because I see design in the biological realm, I am a Christian. In fact, the elegant designs of biochemical systems convinced me as a graduate student that a Creator must exist and be responsible for life’s origin, paving the way for my conversion to Christianity.

    Yet, many skeptics see the features of biological systems very differently than I do. They maintain that life’s origin, design, and diversity are best explained as the outworking of evolutionary processes. As evidence for this view, biologists point to the shared biological and biochemical features (homologies) possessed by organisms that naturally group or cluster together.

    Homologous features may perform different functions and superficially appear different, yet they are fundamentally built around the same design. The quintessential example of a biological homology is the vertebrate forelimb—the human hand, the whale’s flipper, a dog’s paw, a bird’s wing, etc. Though these forelimbs are structurally distinct and perform different biological tasks, they are fundamentally built around the same design. The forelimb of every vertebrate consists of a long bone (humerus) in the arm, an elbow, two bones in the forearm (the radius and ulna), wrist bones (carpals), bones in the “hand” (metacarpals), and “fingers” (phalanges).

    blog__inline--why-would-an-infinite-creator-employ-the-same-designs-1
    Image: Homologous structures of the vertebrate forelimb. Image Credit: Wikipedia

    Evolutionary biologists interpret homologous structures as evolutionarily derived from ancestral features possessed by the common ancestor of the group. With respect to the vertebrate forelimbs, biologists maintain that the forelimb of the first tetrapods had the same design as all vertebrate forelimbs. However, through the course of evolutionary history, natural selection altered the vertebrate forelimbs to perform a variety of functional roles.

    However, as a creationist and a design proponent, I maintain that homologous structures have been designed around an archetypical plan that existed in the Creator’s mind. To put it another way, homologous structures reflect common design, not the outworking of common descent.

    My view on shared biological features led my Facebook friend Phil, a skeptic, to ask the following questions:

    “Just think about the diverse range of creatures an actual creator could have made. And yet we see creatures appearing like and acting like family cousins instead. What would compel an actual designer with unlimited power to design all creatures with the same template, as if the design was a restriction on the designer? Perhaps it was to make belief more difficult, to make only rebellious (non-credulous) hearts disbelieve?”

    Interesting questions, to be certain. This question gets to the core reason why evolutionary biologists reject the arguments for intelligent design. For these many biologists, homologous structures only make sense from within an evolutionary framework.

    The View of Biological Homologies before Darwin

    Part of the response to my friend Phil’s question can be found in the theoretical work of Sir Richard Owen, a prominent biologist from the UK who predated Darwin. One of the world’s most important anatomists in his day, Owen played a key role in discovering, describing, and interpreting biological homologies. Owen understood homologies from a design perspective. Specifically, Owen saw these mutual features as manifestations of a common blueprint that existed in the Creator’s mind, and, in turn, were physically manifested in the created order.

    Archetypes and God’s Creativity

    Instead of seeing the concept of the archetype as restricting God’s creativity, Owen regarded the archetype as reflecting teleology of the highest order. In his presentation to the Royal Institution of Great Britain, Owen lectured: “The satisfaction felt by the rightly constituted mind must ever be great in recognizing the fitness of parts for their appropriate functions; but when this fitness is gained as in the great toe of the foot of man or the ostrich, by a structure which at the same time betokens harmonious concord with a common type, the prescient operations of the One Cause of all organization becomes strikingly manifested to our limited intelligence.”1

    In other words, Owen marveled at the way the Creator generated so much functional diversity from a single template—for example, the pentadactyl architecture of the vertebrate forelimb.

    In fact, the diversity of life on Earth today—even throughout life’s history—built from 30 or so body plans (corresponding to the known animal phyla) is nothing short of mind-boggling. So, apparently creating life on Earth around design templates has done little to limit the Creator. In fact, I would argue—as Owen did— it highlights God’s ingenuity.

    Designed for Discovery

    There are a few reasons why God would have created life’s diversity using a limited set of templates. But, perhaps the most important reason is discoverability.

    The universal nature of biochemistry and the homologous and convergent biological systems allow scientists to generalize what they learn studying one organism to the entirety of the biological realm, in some instances. The universal and homologous designs in biology allow the scientific community to make use of organisms as model systems. For example: by studying DNA replication in bacteria, we have gained key insight that allows us to understand DNA replication in all life on the planet. Studying gene regulation in yeast helps us understand gene regulation in human beings. Studying the developmental pathways of the nematode C. elegans has yielded important knowledge that helps us understand growth and development in many multicellular organisms. Studying genetics in the fruit fly Drosophila has provided key understanding regarding inheritance.

    If, as my friend Phil wants, the Creator used a near infinite array of biological designs when he created, it would be virtually impossible for us to know anything about the living realm. The process of discovery in biology would become cumbersome and laborious.

    Because the living realm is intelligible, it is possible for human beings to take advantage of God’s provision for us, made available within the creation. As we study and develop an understanding of the living realm, we can deploy that knowledge to benefit humanity—in fact, all life on Earth—through agriculture, medicine, conservation efforts, and emerging biotechnologies.

    Ultimately, I believe that God has designed the biological realm for discoverability because He wants us to see, understand, and appreciate his handiwork as a Creator, so through his creation we can know him.

    “It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.”

    Proverbs 25:2

    Resources

    Endnotes
    1. Richard Owen, On the Nature of Limbs: A Discourse, ed. Ron Amundson (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), 38.
  • Reactive Oxygen Species: Harbingers of Evolution or Signals of Design?

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Dec 14, 2016

    Few concepts have been embraced by popular science as enthusiastically as the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are harmful and that their levels should be controlled by including antioxidants in the diet or as supplements.1

    –Ulrich Theopold

    Antioxidants are the latest diet fad. Many people do whatever they can to include foods high in antioxidants in their diets. Some people even go a step further by taking antioxidant supplements. All these actions are meant to combat the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Produced in the mitochondria, these highly reactive chemical derivatives of molecular oxygen will destroy cellular components if left unchecked.

    Yet things aren’t always what they seem. An increasing number of studies indicate that taking dietary supplements of antioxidants has questionable health benefits.2 In fact, taking certain antioxidant supplements may be harmful. For example, studies indicate that people who supplement their diets with vitamin E and beta-carotene have higher mortality rates compared to people who don’t take antioxidant supplements at all. Other studies demonstrate that instead of slowing cancer’s spread, antioxidants, in fact, accelerate the progression of certain cancers. Antioxidant consumption also impacts development, harming certain types of stem cells.

    When it comes to antioxidants and ROS, the scientific community has made another surprising about-face. Biochemists no longer view ROS as harmful compounds, wreaking havoc on the cell’s components. Instead, they have learned that ROS play a key role in cell-signaling processes. As it turns out, consumption of excessive antioxidants interferes with ROS-based signaling pathways. And this interference explains why consuming inordinate levels of antioxidants aren’t part of a healthy lifestyle.

    The surprising implications of this new insight regarding antioxidants and ROS extend beyond dietary considerations. This new understanding has bearing on the creation vs. evolution debate by providing a response to a common objection skeptics level against intelligent design arguments.

    ROS Generation and the Case for Evolution

    ROS are primarily produced in the mitochondria by the electron transport chain (ETC). The ETC harvests energy needed to carry out the various biochemical operations that take place within the cell. For the most part, the ETC is comprised of a series of protein complexes, conceptually organized into a linear array. The first complex of the ETC receives chemically energetic electrons (ultimately, derived from the breakdown of biochemical fuels) and passes them along to the next complex in the ETC. Eventually, these electrons are handed off from complex to complex, until they reach the terminal part of the ETC. When shuttled from one complex to the other, the electrons give up some of their energy. This released energy is captured, and ultimately used to produce compounds such as ATP, which serve as energy currency inside the cell.

    blog__inline--reactive-oxygen-species-1
    Image: Illustration of electron transport chain with oxidative phosphorylation.

    One of the final steps carried out by the ETC is the conversion of molecular oxygen into water, with oxygen receiving the de-energized electrons. If the energy status of the cell is high, the movement of electrons through the ETC slows down, and, under some circumstances, becomes backed up. When this jam occurs, the electrons prematurely react with oxygen because they must go somewhere. (This usually happens between complex I and complex III). When this premature termination takes place, ROS (which include the superoxide ion, the hydroxyl free radical, and hydrogen peroxide) form instead of water.

    At face value, it appears as if ROS form as an unintended side reaction. Traditionally, biochemists regard ROS as deadly compounds that oxidize membrane components, DNA, and proteins, causing untold damage to the cell.

    For many skeptics, the apparently random, unwanted generation of ROS which terrorize the cell undermines the case for intelligent design and serves as evidence for an evolutionary origin of biochemical systems. Why? Because the seemingly unintended production of chemically destructive ROS has all the markings of a flawed system—the type of system unguided evolutionary processes would produce, not the type of design befitting a Creator.

    The Cellular Roles of ROS

    Yet in recent years, biochemists have come to see ROS differently. Instead of the product of an unwanted side reaction, biochemists have come to discover that these compounds serve as second messengers, communicating the cell’s energy status to key metabolic processes, including those that regulate stem cell development.3 These mechanisms allow the cell to coordinate various metabolic processes for the available bioenergetics sources.

    Because hydrogen peroxide has the chemical stability and capacity to dissolve through membranes, biochemists believe that it functions as the primary second messenger. Still, the other ROS do play a role in cell signaling.

    ROS can serve as second messengers because they preferentially oxidize certain amino acids in proteins, with cysteine residues often targeted. The selective oxidation of amino acid residues modifies the activity of the protein targets. Targeted proteins include transcription factors (which control gene expression), and kinases and phosphatases (which regulate different stages of the cell cycle). These protein targets explain why ROS play a critical role in stem cell renewal, stem cell proliferation, and maturation.

    Oxidative Damage by ROS Is a Trade-Off

    ROS are ideal second messengers for communicating and coordinating the cell’s metabolic pathways with respect to the cell’s energy status, because their production is closely linked to the ETC. When the energy status of the cell is high, ROS production increases. And when the cell’s energy status dips, ROS production tails off. In my view, there is an exquisite molecular logic that undergirds the use of ROS as second messengers for communicating the cell’s energy balance.

    Of course, the drawback to using ROS as second messengers is the oxidative damage these materials cause. But instead of viewing the damaging effects of these compounds as a flawed design, I maintain that it is better to think of it as a trade-off.

    Towards that end, it is important to note that the cell has an extensive and elaborate system to buffer against the harmful effects of ROS. For example, superoxide dismutase converts superoxide into hydrogen peroxide. Two other enzymes, catalase and peroxiredoxin, transform hydrogen peroxide into water. In fact, one of the targets of ROS are transcription factors that trigger the production of proteins that are part of the cell’s antioxidant defenses and proteins that take part in pathways that clear damaged proteins from the cell. This ingenious design ensures that once ROS form and play a role as second messengers, the damaged proteins are quickly destroyed and any destruction they cause is mitigated.

    It is truly remarkable how dramatically the scientific community’s views on ROS (and antioxidants) have changed in recent years. Instead of being the unwanted byproducts of metabolism that plagued the cell, ROS serve as a biochemical fuel gage, triggering processes such as quiescence and even autophagy (programmed cell death) when the energy balance is too low and the cell is experiencing starvation and cell differentiation (which impacts stem cell biology) when energy stores are sufficiently full.

    Often, skeptics point to so-called bad designs as evidence for an evolutionary history for life. But, the changed perspective of ROS serves as a cautionary tale. Many times, what is perceived as a bad design turns out to be anything but as we learn more about the system, and these discoveries undermine the best arguments for evolution while adding to the mounting case for intelligent design.

    Resources

    The Cell’s Design by Fazale Rana (book)
    30% Inefficiency by Design” by Fazale Rana (article)
    The Human Appendix: What Is It Good For?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    New Research Highlights Elegant Design in the Inverted Retina” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Wisdom Teeth Reflect the Creator’s Foresight” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Is the Whale Pelvis a Vestige of Evolution?” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Ulrich Theopold, “Developmental Biology: A Bad Boy Comes Good, Nature 461 (September 2009): 486–87, doi:10.1038/461486a.
    2. Center for the Advancement of Health, “Antioxidant Users Don’t Live Longer, Analysis of Studies Concludes,” Science News (blog), ScienceDaily, April 16, 2008, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080415194233.htm; University of Gothenburg, “Antioxidants Cause Malignant Melanoma to Metastasize Faster,” Science News (blog), ScienceDaily, October 8, 2015, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151008131112.htm; Ed Yong, “Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer,” Daily News (blog), The Scientist, January 29, 2014, https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/39022/title/Antioxidants-Speed-Up-Lung-Cancer/; University of Helsinki, “Large Doses of Antioxidants May Be Harmful to Neuronal Stem Cells,” Science News (blog), ScienceDaily, June 11, 2015, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150611091340.htm.
    3. Kira Holmström and Toren Finkel, “Cellular Mechanisms and Physiological Consequences of Redox-Dependent Signalling,” Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 15 (June 2014): 411–21, doi:10.1038/nrm3801; Carolina Bigarella, Raymond Liang, and Saghi Ghaffari, “Stem Cells and the Impact of ROS Signaling,” Development 141 (November 2014): 4206–18, doi:10.1242/dev.107086.
  • Science News Flash: An Old-Earth Perspective on Dinosaur Feathers Preserved in Amber

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Dec 09, 2016

    Whenever we are in a foreign country, my wife loves to shop at local, out-of-the-way markets. She always finds some of the most interesting souvenirs.

    It turns out the same is true for paleontologist Lida Xing who purchased several amber pieces from a market in Myitkyina in the country of Myanmar. The amber sold at the market comes from a nearby mine in the Hukawng Valley. While most buyers are looking for amber to make jewelry, Xing was looking for amber with inclusions of plant and animal remains. The amber from the mine dates to 99 million years. Because of the amber’s age, the well-preserved plant and animal remains entombed by this fossilized tree resin offer a unique glimpse at ancient life on Earth, providing details and insight that far exceed those available from highly compressed fossil remains that typically comprise the fossil record.

    As fate would have it, one of the amber pieces Xing purchased contains a piece of a dinosaur tail (perhaps from a maniraptor) with attached feathers! This discovery is described in a paper that will appear in the December 19 issue of Current Biology.1 Yesterday the paper was published online ahead of the publication date and it has already generated headlines both in the popular news and on social media.

    This is not the first time researchers have discovered feathers preserved in amber. But it is the first time they have observed feathers associated with parts of a dinosaur, in this instance a section of the tail (near the middle or end) that includes eight vertebrae. The anatomical features clearly indicates that the preserved tail belongs to a large group of dinosaurs labeled the coelurosaurs.

    It goes without saying that this find has already caused quite a bit of a stir because of its important implications for evolutionary and creation models for bird origins.

    An Evolutionary Perspective of the Discovery

    For many in the scientific community this discovery further affirms the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, with feathered dinosaurs viewed as transitional intermediates. Along these lines, the researchers describe the dinosaur feathers preserved in amber as transitional, noting that the feather’s central shaft (rachis) is poorly defined. On this basis, the researchers argue that the rachis was a late-appearing feature in feathers, forming when the barbs of the feather fused together.

    An Old-Earth Creationist Response

    As an old-earth creationist, I’m skeptical about the evolutionary account that has birds evolving from theropods. In fact, this latest discovery only adds to my skepticism.

    Paleontologists interpret feathered dinosaurs from the fossil record as transitional intermediates between theropods and birds—including the feathered dinosaur tail found in amber. Yet, each occurrence of feathered dinosaurs in the fossil record appear after the first true bird, Archaeopteryx.2 Based on the fossil record, this ancient bird appeared on Earth around 155 million years ago. Archaeopteryx’s feathers were identical to the feathers of modern birds. In fact, the same research team discovered bird feathers in 99-million-year-old amber from the same source that yielded the amber with the dinosaur feathers. The bird feathers, like those of Archaeopteryx, are identical to those found in modern birds.

    It is hard to imagine how the “primitive” feathers associated with the dinosaur tail (again, dated at 99 million years in age) could be transitional if they appear over 50 million years after Archaeopteryx and co-occur with feathers from a bird belonging to enantiornithes.

    This problem is not unique to the bird fossil record. There are several instances in which presumed transitional forms appear in the fossil record well after the first appearance of their evolutionary descendants. In fact, paleontologist have a name for this phenomenon: a temporal paradox.

    For a more complete discussion of the problems I see with the proposed evolutionary link between birds and theropod dinosaurs, see “Birds in the Fossil Record” (listed in the resource section below).

    A Young-Earth Creationist Perspective of the Discovery

    One exciting aspect of this find is the possibility that soft-tissue remnants associated with the features may be preserved in the amber. The researchers discovered iron (in the ferrous form) associated with the carbonized feather remains. They speculate that this iron derives from hemoglobin originally found in the tail muscle tissue. On this basis, the research team speculates that soft-tissue remnants derived from keratin may be present in the amber-entombed specimen.

    In recent years, young-earth creationists have made use of these types of finds to argue that it is impossible for such fossils to be millions of years old. They argue that soft tissues shouldn’t survive that long. These materials should readily degrade in a few thousand years. In their view, these finds challenge the reliability of radiometric dating methods used to determine the age of these fossils, and along with it, Earth’s antiquity. Instead, they argue that these breakthrough discoveries provide compelling scientific evidence for a young Earth and support the idea that the fossil record results from a recent global (worldwide) flood.

    An Old-Earth Creationist Response

    These types of claims prompted me to write Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earth. In this work (and elsewhere), I explain why the recovery of soft-tissue remnants associated with fossil finds is illegitimate evidence for a young Earth.

    Given the structural robustness of keratin, and the preservative effect of ferrous iron, it is completely reasonable to think that keratin remnants associated with the feathers could survive long enough to be completely entombed by the amber and eventually persist for nearly 100 million years.

    Though this find will be interpreted by the scientific community from an evolutionary vantage point and, more than likely, opted by young-earth creationists to challenge the antiquity of Earth and life on Earth, the dinosaur feathers entombed in amber can readily be accommodated from an old-earth creationist vantage point.

    Resources

    Creation vs. Evolution Controversy

    Is There a Controversy about Evolution?by Fazale Rana (article)
    The Creation-Evolution Controversy in Jurassic Worldby Fazale Rana (article)

    Age-of-the-Earth Controversy

    Dinosaur Blood and the Age of the Earthby Fazale Rana (book).
    Can Keratin in Feathers Survive for Millions of Years?by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Lida Xing et al., “A Feathered Dinosaur Tail with Primitive Plumage Trapped in Mid-Cretaceous Amber,” Current Biology 26 (December 19, 2016): 1–9, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.008.
    2. Some paleontologists claim that the temporal paradox for bird origins was solved based on the discovery of a feathered theropod that dates between 151 and 161 million years in age. (See Dongyu Hu et al., “A Pre-Archaeopteryx Troodontid Theropod from China with Long Feathers on the Metatarsus,” Nature 461 [October 1, 2009]: 640–43, doi:10.1038/nature08322.) However, at best, this find demonstrates the co-occurrence of feathered dinosaurs and the first true bird, when the error bars of the age-date measurements are taken into account.
    3. Lida Xing et al., “Mummified Precocial Bird Wings in Mid-Cretaceous Burmese Amber,” Nature Communications 7 (June 28, 2016): 12089, doi:10.1038/ncomms12089.
  • Pseudoenzymes Illustrate Science's Philosophical Commitments

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Dec 07, 2016

    A few months ago, I had a serious accident while shooting a compound bow in my backyard. The arrow jammed in the guide, and in my attempt to free the arrow, I caused the bow string to derail. When that happened, the string struck my left eye with such force that it fractured my orbit in five places and damaged my retina. I am now legally blind in my left eye. Thankfully, I still have some peripheral vision, but I lost all the central vision in my injured eye. (To mothers everywhere: Yes, I wasn’t careful and I shot my eye out. I should have listened.)

    Because of my injury, there is a blacked-out area in the center part of my field of vision which prevents me from focusing with my left eye. Sometimes, if something is on my left side, I can’t see it—even if it is in plain view.

    Science’s Blind Spot

    Over the years I have come to appreciate that, very often, the creation/intelligent design vs. evolution controversy has less to do with the evidence on hand, and more with how each side sees the evidence. As a case in point, when examining the features of biochemical systems, most creationists and intelligent design proponents readily see evidence of a Creator’s handiwork. Yet adherents to the evolutionary paradigm don’t see evidence for design at all. Instead, they see flawed designs. Why? Because they view biochemical systems as the outworking of an unguided evolutionary history. According to this view, evolution’s mechanisms have cobbled together biochemical systems by co-opting and repurposing existing systems to generate novel biochemical functions. As such, evolution produces kludge-job designs. Not the elegant, sophisticated systems expected if life stems from a Creator’s handiwork.

    In part, the differing perspectives are shaped by philosophical commitments and the expectations that flow from them. To expound upon this point: the philosophical framework for contemporary science is methodological naturalism. Accordingly, scientific explanations for the universe and phenomena within the universe (such as the characteristics of biochemical systems) must have a mechanistic accounting—an explanation exclusively rooted in natural processes. Any explanation that appeals to the work of supernatural agency violates the tenets of methodological naturalism and is not even entertained as a possibility.

    The consequences of methodological naturalism are far ranging for the creation/intelligent design vs. evolution controversy. The constraints of methodological naturalism exclude a priori any model that appeals to intelligent agency to explain, say, the design of biochemical systems. So although biochemical systems bear the appearance of design, the scientific community must explain the design as a product of evolutionary mechanisms. Why? Because they have no other option. If biochemical systems didn’t evolve, then they must have been created. But, the tenets of methodological naturalism forbid this explanation. Hence, biochemical systems must have evolved—by default.

    If biochemical systems arise via evolutionary mechanisms, then they must be cobbled together. They must be poorly designed. Consequently, adherents of the evolutionary paradigm are conditioned to see biochemical systems as poorly designed—even if they aren’t—because of their commitment to methodological naturalism. Many can’t see the design that is in plain view for creationists and intelligent design adherents.

    The recent discovery of pseudoenzymes helps illustrate this point.

    Pseudoenzymes: Evidence for Evolution or Intelligent Design?

    The existence of pseudoenzymes came to light about a decade ago when the human genome sequence was made available for researchers to study. It turns out that almost every enzyme family encoded by the human genome includes seemingly nonfunctioning members. (Enzymes are proteins that catalyze—or facilitate—chemical reactions in the cell.) Biochemists have dubbed these nonfunctioning enzymes pseudoenzymes. These proteins bear structural resemblances to other members of their enzyme families, yet they are unable to catalyze chemical reactions.

    Because researchers have already detected pseudoenzymes within every known enzyme family, they expect that many more pseudoenzymes await discovery. In fact, analysis of thousands of genomes has identified pseudoenzymes throughout the biological realm. To put it another way: Pseudoenzymes seem to be pervasive in biochemical systems.

    Evolutionary biologists view pseudoenzymes as a byproduct of life’s evolutionary history. Presumably, these noncatalytic enzymes arose when genes encoding their functional counterpart became duplicated. After this event, the duplicated genes experienced mutations that disabled the catalytic function of their protein products, generating pseudoenzymes.

    For adherents of the evolutionary paradigm, the widespread occurrence of pseudoenzymes serves as a prima facie (based on first impression) challenge to intelligent design, and a compelling reason to think that biochemical systems are the product of an evolutionary history. In this framework, pseudoenzymes are vestiges of life’s evolutionary past; nonfunctional biochemical scars that impede cellular functions.

    On the other hand, as a creationist and intelligent design proponent, I resist this conclusion. Why? Because I have a different set of presuppositions than most in the scientific community. I believe that life arose through a Creators direct intervention and that science has the tool kit to detect evidence of intelligent agency at work. Because of my precommitments, I would posit yet-to-be-discovered functions for pseudoenzymes and a rationale for why these enzymes bear structural similarity to catalytic counterparts within their enzyme family.

    And this is exactly what biochemists have discovered—pseudoenzymes are, indeed, functional, and there are good reasons why these biomolecules resemble their catalytic analogs.

    The Role and Rationale for Pseudoenzymes

    In a recent primer written for the open access journal BMC Biology, two biochemists surveyed recent work on pseudoenzymes, concluding that this newly recognized class of biomolecules plays a key role in cellular signaling pathways.1

    The authors reflect on the role the evolutionary paradigm played in delaying this insight. They state:

    “Because of the prejudice that focused attention on the catalytic functions of enzymes in signalling pathways, for a long time pseudoenzymes were considered to be dead—and therefore evolutionary remnants or bystanders in cell signalling networks. Contrary to this view, however, pseudoenzymes have now emerged as crucial players operating with an impressive diversity of mechanisms that we are only beginning to understand.”2

    In other words, the biases created by viewing pseudoenzymes as the byproduct of evolutionary processes hindered biochemists from identifying and characterizing the functional importance of pseudoenzymes.

    But this flawed perspective of viewing pseudoenyzmes as junk is changing. To date, biochemists have identified at least four functional roles for pseudoenzymes:

    1. They serve as protein anchors, locating cell signaling enzymes to appropriate locations within the cell.
    2. They function as scaffolds bringing enzymes of the same signaling pathway into proximity with one another, allowing the enzymes to efficiently work in conjunction with one another.
    3. They modulate the function of cell signaling proteins by binding to them, exerting an allosteric-type effect.
    4. They compete with “catalytic” cell signaling enzymes by binding the substrate without transforming it, regulating substrate transformation.

    In part, the functional significance of pseudoenzymes justifies viewing these biomolecules as the work of a Creator. But, if these biomolecules are designed, why would pseudoenzymes be so structurally like their catalytic cohorts? Evolutionary biologists maintain that these similarities reflect their evolutionary history. But, if there is reason for the structural similarities, it further justifies viewing pseudoenzymes as designed systems. As it turns out, a rationale does exist for the close similarity in structure between pseudoenzymes and other members of their enzyme family. As the authors of the survey note:

    “Enzyme structures are predisposed to mediating interactions with protein or metabolite ligands and thus these folds are the ideal templates for nature to repurpose for entirely new functions.”3

    In other words, for pseudoenzymes to influence cellular signaling pathways, they must bind substrates and interact with other proteins in the pathways with a high degree of specificity and with the identical specificity as their catalytic counterparts. Their close resemblance to their catalytic analogs allows these biomolecules to do just that.

    In short, in fulfilling their vital role as regulators of cell signaling pathways, pseudoenzymes display elegance, sophistication, and ingenuity. As a creationist, this is the reason I view these systems as a Creator’s handiwork. Because the field of pseudoenzyme biochemistry is so young, I anticipate the evidence for design to dramatically expand as we learn more about these surprising biomolecules.

    Yet, despite everything we have learned about pseudoenzymes, adherents to the evolutionary paradigm simply can’t see these biomolecules as anything other than the product of an evolutionary history.

    Because of the blind spot created by their philosophical commitments, the design of these systems is occluded from their view—and that causes them to miss the mark.

    Resources
    The Cell’s Design: How Chemistry Reveals the Creator’s Artistry by Fazale Rana (book)
    Pseudoenzymes Make Real Case for Intelligent Design” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Q&A: Is Christianity a Science Showstopper?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Does the Evolutionary Paradigm Stymie Scientific Advance?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Q&A: Is Evolution Falsifiable?” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Patrick Eyers and James Murphy, “The Evolving World of Pseudoenzymes: Proteins, Prejudice, and Zombies,” BMC Biology 14 (November 2016): 98, doi:10.1186/s12915-016-0322-x.
    2. Ibid.
    3. Ibid.
  • Ancient Muds Bog Down Evolutionary Explanation for Life’s Origin

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Nov 30, 2016

    When I was a kid, I played a lot of sandlot football. And nothing was more fun than playing football after a hard rain on a muddy field. It was a blast to slosh around in the mud. But if the field was too muddy, it was hard to run, making it difficult to advance the ball down the field.

    Scientists like playing in the mud, too. And recently, a scientist from the University of Washington had a good time working with ancient mud from early Earth (dating to 3.8 billion years in age). As a result of her efforts, Eva Stüeken now argues that the nitrogen in some of the oldest muddy sediments on Earth was produced by microorganisms.

    Her interpretation of the nitrogen in ancient muds adds to the mounting evidence for an early and rapid origin of life, making it more difficult for the scientific community to advance an evolutionary explanation for life’s start.1

    In earlier studies, geochemists measured about 430 parts per million (ppm) nitrogen in biotite minerals recovered from 3.8-billion-year-old sediments of the Isua Formation of Greenland. Typically, the highest levels of nitrogen co-occur with graphite granules. (Some geochemists regard the graphite granules as a biomarker.) Because nitrogen is an integral component of biomolecules such as DNA and proteins, the occurrence of this element in the biotite can be taken as a biosignature.

    Unfortunately, it is not that straightforward. Some geochemists claim that the nitrogen in the ancient mud comes from abiotic sources. For example, lightning and volcanism can fix atmospheric nitrogen, conceivably accounting for its presence in the biotite grains.

    To test this idea, University of Washington earth scientist Eva Stüeken modeled the amount of abiotic nitrogen that would be expected in ancient muds if it came exclusively from abiotic processes. She determined that abiotic pathways were insufficient to explain nitrogen levels, meaning that some of the nitrogen must be biogenic.

    Early Life on Earth

    The presence of nitrogen in ancient muds adds to the mounting geochemical and fossil evidence that points to the presence of life on early Earth. (See the Resources section below to learn about other evidences for early life on Earth.) It looks like life appeared on Earth as soon as our planet could sustain it. In fact, a case can be made that life could not have originated and persisted on Earth prior to 3.8 billion years ago. This constraint means that life must have originated within a geological instant.

    Both the geochemical and fossil evidence indicate that Earth’s first life was microbial in nature. Though morphologically simple, the geochemical data indicates this life was biochemically diverse and complex. There are good reasons to think that the first life-forms could engage in a wide range of metabolic activities including: photosynthesis, methanogenesis, methanotrophism, and sulfur disproportionation. While far from conclusive, the biogenic nitrogen in the ancient muds suggests that Earth’s first life also had the capacity to fix nitrogen.

    Evidence for Evolution or Creation?

    As discussed in Origins of Life, the sudden, early appearance of metabolically sophisticated life on Earth is difficult to accommodate within an evolutionary framework. Traditionally, origin-of-life researchers have maintained that the origin-of-life process would have required hundreds of millions of years—maybe even a billion years. To put it another way, when viewed from an evolutionary standpoint, no one would have expected that lifes origin would have happened so rapidly.

    This latest insight about the ancient muds creates an additional problem for evolutionary models. It argues against the existence of a prebiotic soup on early Earth. This idea is a cornerstone for most origin-of-life models. Accordingly, life emerged on early Earth out of a prebiotic soup—a complex chemical mixture—as the molecules in the soup became more complex and, eventually, self-organized into the first cellular entities.

    If a prebiotic soup existed on Earth, it should leave behind a geochemical signature in the oldest rocks on Earth. Geochemists have uncovered chemical residues in the oldest rock formations on Earth—including the nitrogen in the ancient muds—but inevitably, these residues turn out to be biogenic in origin, not abiotic. In other words, there is no geochemical evidence for a prebiotic soup. This idea is all covered with the mud.

    On the other hand, the sudden appearance of biochemically complex life on early Earth bears the signature of the Creator’s handiwork. They are also key predictions for the RTB model for life’s origin.

    Resources

    Origins of Life: Biblical and Evolutionary Models Face Off by Fazale Rana and Hugh Ross (book)
    Creating Life in the Lab: How New Discoveries in Synthetic Biology Make a Case for the Creator by Fazale Rana (book)
    Science News Flash: 3.7-Billion-Year-Old Fossils Perplex Origin-of-Life Researchers” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Early Life was More Complex than We Thought” by Fazale Rana (article)
    When Did Life First Appear on Earth?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Origin-of-Life Predictions Face Off: Evolution vs. Biblical Creation” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Fossils Indicate Early Life Was Metabolically Complex and Diverse” by Fazale Rana (podcast)
    Life May Have Begun 300 Million Years Earlier Than We Thought” by Fazale Rana (podcast)

    Endnotes
    1. Eva Stüeken, “Nitrogen in Ancient Mud: A Biosignature?” Astrobiology 16 (September 2016): 730–35, doi:10.1089/ast.2016.1478.
  • Can a Creation Model Explain the Origin of Mitochondria?

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Nov 23, 2016

    Some called her a scientific heretic. Others were a bit more kind, describing her as a maverick.

    Lynn Margulis (1938–2011) earned her reputation in the late 1960s when she proposed the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of eukaryotic cells. Because her ideas about evolution didn’t conform to Darwinian principles, evolutionary biologists summarily dismissed her idea out of hand and then went on to ignore her work for a couple of decades. She was ultimately vindicated, however, as the endosymbiont hypothesis gradually gained acceptance.

    Today, Margulis’s proposal has become a cornerstone idea of the evolutionary paradigm and is taught in introductory high school and college biology courses. This classroom exposure explains why I am often asked about the endosymbiont hypothesis when I speak on university campuses. Many first-year biology students and professional life scientists alike find the evidence for this idea compelling, and consequently view it as providing broad support for an evolutionary explanation for the history and design of life.

    Yet, new work by biochemists from Cambridge University make it possible to account for the origin of eukaryotic cells from a creation model perspective, providing a response to the endosymbiont hypothesis.1

    The Endosymbiont Hypothesis

    According to this hypothesis, complex cells originated when symbiotic relationships formed among single-celled microbes after free-living bacterial and/or archaeal cells were engulfed by a “host” microbe. (Ingested cells that take up permanent residence within other cells are referred to as endosymbionts.)

    Accordingly, organelles, such as mitochondria, were once endosymbionts. Once taken inside the host cell, the endosymbionts presumably took up permanent residency within the host, with the endosymbionts growing and dividing inside the host. Over time, the endosymbionts and the host became mutually interdependent, with the endosymbionts providing a metabolic benefit for the host cell. The endosymbionts gradually evolved into organelles through a process referred to as genome reduction. This reduction resulted when genes from the endosymbionts genomes were transferred into the genome of the host organism. Eventually, the host cell evolved both the machinery to produce the proteins needed by the former endosymbiont and the processes needed to transport those proteins into the organelle’s interior.

    Evidence for the Endosymbiont Hypothesis

    The main line of evidence for the endosymbiont hypothesis is the similarity between organelles and bacteria. For example, mitochondria—which are believed to be descended from a group of α-proteobacteria—are about the same size and shape as a typical bacterium and have a double membrane structure like gram-negative cells. These organelles also divide in a way that is reminiscent of bacterial cells.

    There is also biochemical evidence for the endosymbiont hypothesis. Evolutionary biologists view the existence of the diminutive mitochondrial genome as a vestige of this organelle’s evolutionary history. Additionally, the biochemical similarities between mitochondrial and bacterial genomes are taken as further evidence for the evolutionary origin of these organelles.

    The presence of the unique lipid called cardiolipin in the mitochondrial inner membrane also serves as evidence for the endosymbiont hypothesis. Cardiolipin is an important lipid component of bacterial inner membranes, yet it is not found in the membranes of eukaryotic cells—except for the inner membranes of mitochondria. In fact, biochemists consider it a signature lipid for mitochondria and a vestige of this organelle’s evolutionary history.

    A Creation Model Perspective on Mitochondria

    So, as a creationist, how do I make sense of the evidence for the endosymbiont hypothesis?

    Instead of focusing my efforts on refuting the endosymbiont hypothesis, here, I take a different approach. I maintain that it is reasonable to view eukaryotic cells as the work of a Creator, with the shared similarities between mitochondria and bacteria reflecting common design rather than common descent.

    However, to legitimately interpret mitochondrial origins from a creation model perspective, there must be a reason for the biochemical similarities between mitochondria and bacteria. Previously, I wrote about discoveries that provide a rationale for why mitochondria have their own genomes. (See “Resources.”) Thanks to recent research advances, an explanation now exists for why the mitochondrial inner membranes harbor cardiolipin.

    Cardiolipin’s Function

    Previous studies identified close associations between cardiolipin and a number of proteins found in the mitochondrial inner membrane. These proteins play a role in harvesting energy for the cell to use. Compared to other lipid components found in the inner membrane, cardiolipin appears to preferentially associate with these proteins. Evidence indicates that cardiolipin helps to stabilize the structures of these proteins and serves to organize the proteins into larger functional complexes within the membrane.2 In fact, several studies have implicated defects in cardiolipin metabolism in the onset of a number of neuromuscular disorders.

    The work of the Cambridge University investigators adds to this insight. These researchers were using computer simulations to model the interactions between cardiolipin and a protein complex called F1-F0 ATPase. Embedded within the inner membrane of mitochondria, this complex is a biomolecular rotary motor that produces the compound ATP—an energy storage material the cell’s machinery uses to power its operations.

    Like other proteins found in the inner membrane, cardiolipin forms a close association with F1-F0 ATPase. However, instead of permanently binding to the surface of the protein complex, cardiolipin dynamically interacts with this membrane-embedded protein complex. The researchers think that this dynamic association and the unusual chemical structure of cardiolipin (which gives it the flexibility to interact with a protein surface) are critical for its role within the mitochondrial inner membrane. As it turns out, cardiolipin not only stabilizes the F1-F0 ATPase complex (as it does for other inner membrane proteins), but it also lubricates the protein’s rotor, allowing it to turn in the viscous cell membrane environment. Also, its unique structure helps move protons through the F1-F0 ATPase motor, providing the electrical power to operate this biochemical motor.

    The bottom line: There is an exquisite biochemical rationale for why cardiolipin is found in mitochondrial inner membranes (and bacterial membranes). In light of this new insight, it is reasonable to view the shared similarities between these organelles and bacteria as reflecting common design—the product of the Creator’s handiwork. Like most biological systems, this organelle appears to be designed for a purpose.

    Resources
    Why Do Mitochondria Have DNA?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Mitochondrial Genomes: Evidence for Evolution or Creation?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Complex Protein Biogenesis Hints at Intelligent Designby Fazale Rana (article)
    Archetype or Ancestor? Sir Richard Owen and the Case for Designby Fazale Rana (article)
    Nanodevices Make Megascopic Statementby Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Anna Duncan, Alan Robinson, and John Walker, “Cardiolipin Binds Selectively but Transiently to Conserved Lysine Residues in the Rotor of Metazoan ATP Synthases,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 113 (August 2016): 8687–92, doi:10.1073/pnas.1608396113.
    2. Giuseppe Paradies et al., “Functional Role of Cardiolipin in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta—Bioenergetics 1837 (April 2014): 408–17, doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2013.10.006.
  • Science News Flash: Chimps Use Tools to Fish for Algae

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Nov 16, 2016

    Some of my fondest memories as a little kid are the summer afternoons I spent with my grandfather fishing in the Missouri River, near Mandan, North Dakota.

    I don’t remember catching many fish, but that didn’t matter. I enjoyed spending time with my grandpa. I’m sure the experience was a bit trying for him though. If I detected even the slightest movement, I would reel in my line, hoping there would be a fish on the end. Inevitably, my excitement would give way to disappointment when I discovered that all I had caught was a clump of algae. And, of course, grandpa would have to clean up the mess I created and then recast my line.

    But my response to reeling in an algae clump would have been different if I was a chimpanzee—if the field observations of primatologists from Germany are to be believed. Instead of disappointment, I would have been excited by my green, slimy, catch. As it turns out, chimpanzees will eat algae. It can be a valuable food source for them, rich in protein, carbohydrates, and minerals.

    The German primatologists recently generated headlines when they published a report in the American Journal of Primatology describing 15 months of field work in the Bakoun Classified Forest of Guinea.1 Using camera footage from 11 different sites, the research team observed both male and female chimpanzees of every age using sticks (ranging from 6 inches to 12 feet in length) to “fish” algae out of rivers, streams, and ponds during the dry season.

    The chimpanzees’ fishing efforts could last for up to an hour, with the average duration being around nine minutes. The chimps typically collected around a tenth of a pound of algae for each fishing expedition.

    Evolutionary anthropologists point to these types of observations as shedding important light on the evolution of human behavior. They maintain that the use of tools by chimpanzees is an antecedent to the advanced behaviors displayed by modern humans.

    However, I take a different view, maintaining that these types of discoveries actually undermine the standard models of human evolution. How so? These insights place chimpanzee behavior closer to hominid behavior (inferred from the fossil record). The temptation is to see hominid tool use as transitional, a way station on the path to modern human behavior. Yet the newly recognized behavior of chimpanzees distances the hominids from modern humans. Just because hominids such as habilines and erectines made tools and engaged in other remarkable behaviors doesn’t mean that they were becoming human. Instead, their behavior appears to be increasingly animal-like, particularly in light of the newly discovered chimp activities.

    Resources
    Who Was Adam? by Fazale Rana with Hugh Ross (book)
    Chimpanzee Behavior Supports RTB’s Model for Humanity’s Origin” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Chimpanzees’ Sleeping Habits Closer to Hominid Behavior than to Humans‘” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Chimpanzees Respond to Death like Humans: Evidence for Evolution or Creation? Part 1 (of 2)” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Chimpanzees Respond to Death like Humans: Evidence for Evolution or Creation? Part 2 (of 2)” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Christophe Boesch et al,. “Chimpanzees Routinely Fish for Algae with Tools during the Dry Season in Bakoun, Guinea,” American Journal of Primatology, published electronically November 3, 2016, doi:10.1002/ajp.22613.
  • The Logic of DNA Replication Makes a Case for Intelligent Design

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Nov 09, 2016

    Why do I think God exists?

    In short: The elegance, sophistication, and ingenuity of biochemical systems—and their astonishing similarity to man-made systems—convinces me that God is responsible for life’s origin and design.

    While many skeptics readily acknowledge the remarkable designs of biochemical systems, they would disagree with my conclusion about God’s existence. Why? Because for every biochemical system I point to that displays beauty and elegance, they can point to one that seems to be poorly designed. In their view, these substandard designs reflect life’s evolutionary origin. They argue that evolutionary mechanisms kludged together the cell’s chemical systems through a historically contingent process that co-opted preexisting systems, cobbling them together to form new biochemical systems.

    According to skeptics, one doesn’t have to look hard to find biochemical systems that seem to have been put together in a haphazard manner, and DNA replication appears to be an example of this. In many respects, DNA replication lies at the heart of the cell’s chemical operations. If designed by a Creator, this biochemical system, above all others, should epitomize intelligent design. Yet the DNA replication process appears to be unwieldy, inefficient, and unduly complex—the type of system evolution would generate by force, not the type of system worthy to be designated the product of the Creator’s handiwork.

    Yet new work by Japanese researchers helps explain why DNA replication is the way it is.1 Instead of reflecting the cumbersome product of an unguided evolutionary history, the DNA replication process displays an exquisite molecular logic.

    To appreciate the significance of the Japanese study and its implication for the creation/evolution controversy, a short biochemistry primer is in order. For readers who are familiar with DNAs structure and the DNA replication process, you can skip the next two sections.

    DNA

    DNA consists of chain-like molecules known as polynucleotides. Two polynucleotide chains align in an antiparallel fashion to form a DNA molecule. (The two strands are arranged parallel to one another with the starting point of one strand in the polynucleotide duplex located next to the ending point of the other strand and vice versa.) The paired polynucleotide chains twist around each other to form the well-known DNA double helix. The cell’s machinery forms polynucleotide chains by linking together four different subunit molecules called nucleotides. The nucleotides used to build DNA chains are adenosine, guanosine, cytidine, and thymidine, famously abbreviated A, G, C, and T, respectively.

    The nucleotide molecules that make up the strands of DNA are, in turn, complex molecules consisting of both a phosphate moiety, and a nucleobase (either adenine, guanine, cytosine, or thymine) joined to a 5-carbon sugar (deoxyribose).

    blog__inline--logic-of-dna-replication-makes-case-for-intelligent-design-1

    Image 1: Adenosine Monophosphate, a Nucleotide

    Repeatedly linking the phosphate group of one nucleotide to the deoxyribose unit of another nucleotide forms the backbone of the DNA strand. The nucleobases extend as side chains from the backbone of the DNA molecule and serve as interaction points when the two DNA strands align and twist to form the double helix.
    blog__inline--logic-of-dna-replication-makes-case-for-intelligent-design-2

    Image 2: The DNA Backbone

    When the two DNA strands align, the adenosine (A) side chains of one strand always pair with thymidine (T) side chains from the other strand. Likewise, the guanosine (G) side chains from one DNA strand always pair with cytidine (C) side chains from the other strand.

    DNA Replication

    Biochemists refer to DNA replication as a template-directed, semi-conservative process. By template-directed, biochemists mean that the nucleotide sequences of the “parent” DNA molecule function as a template, directing the assembly of the DNA strands of the two “daughter” molecules. By semi-conservative, biochemists mean that after replication, each daughter DNA molecule contains one newly formed DNA strand and one strand from the parent molecule.

    blog__inline--logic-of-dna-replication-makes-case-for-intelligent-design-3

    Image 3: Semi-Conservative DNA Replication

    Conceptually, template-directed, semi-conservative DNA replication entails the separation of the parent DNA double-helix into two single strands. By using the base-pairing rules, each strand serves as a template for the cell’s machinery to use when it forms a new DNA strand with a nucleotide sequence complementary to the parent strand. Because each strand of the parent DNA molecule directs the production of a new DNA strand, two daughter molecules result. Each one possesses an original strand from the parent molecule and a newly formed DNA strand produced by a template-directed synthetic process.

    DNA replication begins at specific sites along the DNA double helix, called replication origins. The DNA double helix unwinds locally at the origin of replication to produce what biochemists call a replication bubble. The bubble expands in both directions from the origin during the course of DNA replication. Once the individual strands of the DNA double helix unwind and are exposed within the replication bubble, they are available to direct the production of the daughter strand. The site where the DNA double helix continuously unwinds is called the replication fork. Because DNA replication proceeds in both directions away from the origin, there are two replication forks within each bubble.

    blog__inline--logic-of-dna-replication-makes-case-for-intelligent-design-4

    Image 4: DNA Replication

    DNA replication can only proceed in a single direction, from the top of the DNA strand to the bottom. Because the strands that form the DNA double helix align in an antiparallel fashion with the top of one strand juxtaposed to the bottom of the other strand, only one strand at each replication fork has the proper orientation (bottom-to-top) to direct the assembly of a new strand, in the top-to-bottom direction. For this strand—referred to as the “leading strand”—DNA replication proceeds rapidly and continuously in the direction of the advancing replication fork.

    DNA replication can’t proceed along the strand with the top-to-bottom orientation until the replication bubble has expanded enough to expose a sizable stretch of DNA. When this happens, DNA replication moves away from the advancing replication fork. DNA replication can only proceed a short distance for the top-to-bottom oriented strand before the replication process has to stop and wait for more of the parent DNA strand to be exposed. When a sufficient length of the parent DNA template is exposed for a second time, DNA replication can proceed again, but only briefly before it has to stop again and wait for more DNA to be exposed. The process of discontinuous DNA replication takes place repeatedly until the entire strand is replicated. Each time DNA replication starts and stops, a small fragment of DNA is produced. Biochemists refer to these pieces of DNA (that will eventually comprise the daughter strand) as “Okazaki fragments,” named after the biochemist who discovered them. Biochemists call the strand produced discontinuously the “lagging strand,” because DNA replication for this strand lags behind the more rapidly produced leading strand.

    One additional point: The leading strand at one replication fork is the lagging strand at the other replication fork, since the replication forks at the two ends of the replication bubble advance in opposite directions.

    Before the newly formed daughter strands can be produced, a small RNA primer must be produced. The protein that synthesizes new DNA by reading the parent DNA template strand—DNA polymerase—can’t start production from scratch. It has to be primed. A massive protein complex, called the primosome, which consists of more than 15 different proteins, produces the RNA primer needed by DNA polymerase.

    Once primed, DNA polymerase will continuously produce DNA along the leading strand. However, for the lagging strand, DNA polymerase can only generate DNA in spurts to produce Okazaki fragments. Each time DNA polymerase generates an Okazaki fragment, the primosome complex must produce a new RNA primer.

    Once DNA replication is completed, the RNA primers are removed from the continuous DNA of the leading strand and the Okazaki fragments that make up the lagging strand. A protein called a 3’–5’ exonuclease removes the RNA primers. A different DNA polymerase fills in the gaps created by the removal of the RNA primers. Finally, a protein called a ligase connects all the Okazaki fragments together to form a continuous piece of DNA out of the lagging strand.

    DNA Replication and the Case for Evolution

    This cursory description of DNA replication clearly illustrates the complexity of this biochemical operation. (Many details of the process were left out of the discussion.) This description also reveals why biochemists view this process as cumbersome and unwieldy. There is no obvious reason why DNA replication proceeds as a semi-conservative, RNA primer-dependent, unidirectional process involving leading and lagging strands to produce DNA daughter molecules. Because of this uncertainty, skeptics view DNA replication as a chance outcome of a historically contingent process, kludged together from the biochemical leftovers of the RNA world.

    If there is one feature of DNA replication that is responsible for the complexity of the process, it is the directionality of DNA replication—from top to bottom. At first glance, it would seem as if the process would be simpler and more elegant if replication could proceed in both directions. Skeptics argue that the fact that it doesn’t reflects the evolutionary origin of the replication process.

    Yet work by the team from Sapporo, Japan indicates that there is an exquisite molecular rationale for the directionality of DNA replication.

    Why DNA Replication Proceeds in a Single Direction

    These researchers recognized an important opportunity to ask why DNA replication proceeds only in a single direction with the discovery of a class of enzymes that add nucleotides to the ends of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. (tRNA molecules ferry amino acids to the ribsosome during protein synthesis.) If damaged, tRNA molecules cannot properly carry out their role in protein production. Fortunately, there are repair enzymes that can fix damaged tRNA molecules. One of them is called Thg-1-like protein (TLP).

    TLP adds nucleotides to damaged ends of tRNA molecules. But instead of adding the nucleotides top to bottom, the enzyme adds these subunit molecules to the tRNA bottom to top, the opposite direction of DNA replication.

    By determining the mechanism employed by TLP during bottom-to-top nucleotide addition, the researchers gained important insight into the constraints of DNA replication. As it turns out, bottom-to-top addition is a much more complex process than the normal top-to-bottom nucleotide addition. Bottom-to-top addition is a cumbersome two-step process that requires an enzyme with two active sites that have to be linked together in a precise way. In contrast, top-to-bottom addition is a simple, one-step reaction that proceeds with a single active site. In other words, DNA replication proceeds in a single direction (top-to-bottom) because it is mechanistically simpler and more efficient.

    One could argue that the complexity that arises by the top-to-bottom DNA replication process is a trade-off for a mechanistically simpler nucleotide addition reaction. Still, if DNA replication proceeded in both directions the process would be complex and unwieldy. For example, if replication proceeded in two directions, the cell would require two distinct types of primosomes and DNA polymerases, one set for each direction of DNA replication. Employing two sets of primosomes and DNA polymerases is clearly less efficient than employing a single set of enzymes.

    Ironically, if DNA replication could proceed in two directions, there still would be a leading and a lagging strand. Why? Because bottom-to-top replication is a two-step process and would proceed more slowly than the single step of top-to-bottom replication. In other words, the assembly of the DNA strand in a bottom-to-top direction would lag behind the assembly of the DNA strand that traveled in a top-to-bottom direction.

    Bidirectional DNA replication would also cause another complication due to a crowding effect. Once the replication bubble opens, both sets of replication enzymes would have to fit into the replication bubble’s constrained space. This molecular overcrowding would further compromise the efficiency of the replication process. Overcrowding is not an issue for unidirectional DNA replication that proceeds in a top-to-bottom direction.

    The bottom line: In light of this new insight, it is hard to argue that DNA replication has been cobbled together via a historically contingent pathway. Instead, it is looking more and more like a process ingenuously designed by a Divine Mind.

    Resources
    The Cell’s Design: How Chemistry Reveals the Creator’s Artistry by Fazale Rana (book)
    DNA Soaks Up Sun’s Rays” by Fazale Rana (article)
    DNA: Designed for Flexibility” by Fazale Rana (article)
    How the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology Points to Design” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Why I Believe God Exists: Evidences from a Biochemist” by Fazale Rana (video)

    Endnotes
    1. Shoko Kimura et al., “Template-Dependent Nucleotide Addition in the Reverse (3–5) Direction by Thg1-like Protein,” Science Advances 2 (March 2016): e1501397, doi:10.1126/sciadv.1501397.
  • Can New Medical Technology Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before?

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Nov 02, 2016

    When I was in junior high, I would rush home every day after school to tune in to the afternoon reruns of Star Trek.

    Fascinated by the technology possessed by the crew of the Enterprise, I often imagined what it would be like if I had their high-tech devices.

    I was particularly intrigued by the tricorder Spock used to collect readings when the team beamed down to a planet’s surface. As a professional biochemist, I really came to appreciate the powerful technology Spock had at his fingertips. Gaining even cursory insight into a biochemical sample can take weeks of hard work in the lab. But for Spock, pointing the tricorder in the direction of the alien life-form was all he had to do. Of course, Spock didn’t get to have all the fun.

    Dr. McCoy had a tricorder too. His instrument could be used to diagnose sick and injured crew members by simply passing a wand over the patients. Wouldn’t it be great if physicians could diagnosis our ailments so quickly and easily? No more trips to the doctor’s office. No more late-night excursions to the emergency room.

    Well, science fiction is about to become science fact, thanks to work by engineers from Washington University. These researchers developed a smart phone app that can measure hemoglobin concentration in a patient’s blood after the patient presses his/her finger against the phone’s camera.1

    This new technology represents an important advance in medical screening, allowing physicians to quickly test for anemia. This blood disorder is rampant in the developing world, caused by malnutrition and parasite infections.

    Measuring the blood’s oxygen-carrying capacity is key for diagnosing anemia. Detecting and monitoring anemia can be difficult in a third-world context, because the most reliable method for determining the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood involves drawing blood and counting red blood cells. This procedure: (1) exposes medical workers to the patient’s blood; (2) runs the risk of being unsanitary, introducing the risk of infection; and (3) requires access to a laboratory to count the red blood cells.

    Noninvasive methods exist, but they require expensive medical instruments.

    These limitations motivated the University of Washington team to develop the smart phone app to measure hemoglobin content in blood. This technology is relatively inexpensive, mobile, and can yield rapid results—ideal for screening for anemia in the field.

    HemaApp

    The University of Washington team dubbed their app: HemaApp. The app makes use of an algorithm that converts video images of the patient’s finger into a series of oscillating curves corresponding to different wavelengths of light. The form of these curves is influenced by the absorption of light by hemoglobin in the blood (which causes blood’s red color). The more hemoglobin, the greater the blood’s light absorption at certain wavelengths of light.

    In a pilot study (involving men and women, patients of all ages, and several ethnicities), the researchers showed that HemaApp performed as well as the leading noninvasive blood monitoring technologies, paving the way to use this technology in the field.

    These researchers think that their accomplishments are the first step toward broader usage of smart phones for medical screening. It is conceivable that the technology can be adapted to screen for sickle-cell anemia, which is caused by mutations to the gene encoding hemoglobin. These mutations lead to hemoglobin with a distorted structure, which alters its light absorption spectrum.

    This technology will also be a benefit to people living in the first world. Patients with anemia can monitor the hemoglobin level of their blood at home, providing them with a tool to more effectively manage their health issues. Because the hemoglobin measurements are made with a smart phone, the data can be easily sent to the patient’s physician.

    HemaApp isn’t quite as impressive as a medical tricorder, but it sure is a big step in that direction.

    Yet, as promising as the biomedical implications are for this advance, the bioethical implications are even more exciting.

    Biomedical Technology, Bioethics, and Social Justice

    Many Christians are vigilant about the ethical implications associated with biomedical advances, raising concerns when technologies undermine the sanctity of human life.

    Yet, a neglected area of bioethics relates to the accessibility of medical care and emerging biomedical technologies. Many diagnostic tools and medical procedures require highly specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. These requirements sometimes render even the most basic medical care so costly that only a relatively small percentage of the world’s population has access to life-saving biomedical technologies.

    In my view, the inequitable distribution of medical care should be considered as much a pro-life issue as the destruction of human embryos associated with many emerging biotechnologies or euthanasia. Like all Christians, I hold the view that all human life has immeasurable value—inherent worth and dignity—because all human beings are made in God’s image. If so, then it is reasonable to think that all human beings have fundamental human rights. And, in my view, that includes equal access to basic medical care. And ideally, beyond that, all human beings should be able to equally benefit from biomedical advances.

    The use of smartphones as a medical screening tool moves us one step closer to realizing this ideal. HemaApp stands as a powerful new biomedical technology, but it is affordable and portable. These features make it possible for the wealthiest and poorest people on the planet to benefit from this advance. In fact, this technology could be transformative for some of the poorest parts of the world by helping medical workers quickly identify and treat those people suffering from anemia.

    The University of Washington researchers bring us one step closer to the dream of a young teenager who loved to watch Star Trek. They are also making it possible to envision how, as human beings, we can boldly go where no one has gone before—to a world where biotechnology provides treatments and therapies for many horrible diseases and injuries and also makes basic medical care accessible to the worlds poor.

    Resources

    Embryonic Stem Cell Research: An Interview with Dr. Fazale ‘Fuz Rana” (article)
    Q&A: Is a New in vitro Fertilization Method Ethical?” by Fazale Rana (article)
    GNINOLC: We Have It All Backwards” by Fazale Rana (article)
    Advance Holds Potential to Resolve Cloning’s Ethical Challenges” by Fazale Rana (article)

    Endnotes
    1. Edward Jay Wang et al., “HemaApp: Noninvasive Blood Screening of Hemoglobin Using Smartphone Cameras,” Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (September 2016): 593–604, doi:10.1145/2971648.2971653.
  • Placenta Optimization Shows Creator's Handiwork

    by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author | Oct 19, 2016

    The Creator of the universe desires an intimate relationship with each of us.

    It is one of the more outrageous claims of the Christian faith. And no passage of Scripture expresses the intimacy between Creator and creature more than Psalm 139:13.

    A fresh perspective on this passage of Scripture comes from recent work by researchers from Cambridge University in the UK. This study reveals the central role the placenta plays in properly allocating nutritional resources between mother and child, illustrating the intimate care God provided for us through the elegant design of embryological development.1

    This research also has important pro-life implications, providing a response to the claim that the fetus is nothing more than a harmful mass of tissue.

    Nutritional Demands of the Fetus and the Mother

    For a pregnancy to be successful, nutrients must be carefully distributed between the fetus and the mother. Yet sharing nutrients runs contrary to the biological tendencies of the mother and the unborn baby. The fetus has a genetic drive for growth and craves all the nutrients it can get. So does the mother. But for the fetus to grow and develop, the mother must provide it with the nutrients it needs, setting up a potential tug of war between the mother and the developing baby in her womb.

    Ironically, if the fetus hoards nutrients excessively, the hoarding can backfire. If the mother doesn’t have access to sufficient nutrients during the pregnancy, it can negatively impact lactation and the mother’s long-term health, which, in turn, compromises her ability to care for the child after birth.

    As it turns out, the placenta plays a critical role in managing this trade-off. Instead of being passive tissue that absorbs available nutrients from the mother, the placenta dynamically distributes nutrients between mother and fetus, optimally ensuring the health of both mother and developing baby. To do this, the placenta receives metabolic signals from both the mother and fetus and responds to this input by regulating the nutrient amounts made available to the fetus.

    One of the key genes involved in nutrient regulation is called p110α. This gene codes for a protein that integrates the metabolic signals from mother and fetus. The Cambridge University researchers wanted to understand the role that the maternal and fetal versions of this gene play in parsing the nutrient supply between mother and developing baby.

    What Happens When p110α Is Defective in Mother and Child?

    What happens when p110α is defective in mother and child? To answer this question, the research team used mice as a model system, preparing genetic mutants, so that either the mother or fetus had a defective version of the p110α gene. If the mother had a healthy p110α gene, but the fetus a defective version, the placenta developed abnormally. But in spite of its defective appearance, the placenta compensated so that it would still take up the nutrients the fetus needed to develop. However, if the mother had a defective version of the p110α gene, the placenta (which formed abnormally even though the fetus had a healthy version of the p110α gene) transported fewer nutrients to the fetus.

    In adult tissue, the p110α gene plays a role in regulating growth in relationship to nutrient supply and mediates the metabolic effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors. That means that a defective version of this gene models conditions in which the mother’s health is compromised due to disease, poor nutrition, stress, or other factors.

    On the basis of this study, it appears that when the mother is healthy, the placenta readily transports nutrients to the fetus and dynamically adjusts, even if it forms abnormally. On the other hand, if the mother’s health is compromised, the placenta restricts nutrient flow to the fetus to ensure the mother’s long-term health, with the prospects that the fetus can still grow and develop.

    This insight has important biomedical implications. In the developing world, one in five pregnancy complications involve the placenta. In the developed world, this number is one in eight. The researchers hope that this insight will help them understand the etiologies behind problem pregnancies and also help them identify biomarkers that will alert physicians to problems earlier in the pregnancy.

    This work also has important apologetics implications, as well.

    Indeed, We Are Fearfully and Wonderfully Made

    This work highlights the elegance of embryological development. It seems an exquisite rationale—a biological logic, if you will—undergirds every aspect of development. The optimal way the placenta partitions resources between mother and fetus, carefully managing trade-offs, evinces the handiwork of the Creator, and reveals the Creator’s intimate care for the fetus.

    The devastating effects caused by mutations to the p110α gene raises questions about the capacity of evolutionary mechanisms to explain the origin of the reproductive system in placental mammals. Because the placenta is not a passive conduit for nutrients between mother and fetus, the challenges of explaining its genesis via unguided evolutionary process become insurmountable. If the placenta lacks the capability to effectively allocate resources between the mother and fetus—or even if this process operates in a suboptimal manner—the fetus may not survive, or the mother may not be healthy enough to nurse and rear the child once it’s born. In other words, it becomes difficult to imagine how the placenta’s role in embryological development could evolve from an imperfect system to an optimal system under the influence of natural selection because of the critical, dynamic role the placenta plays in embryological development. If this role isn’t properly executed, the child isn’t likely to make it to reproductive age.

    Is the Fetus Like a Tumor?

    This work also has implications for the pro-life debate. I have often heard pro-choice advocates argue that abortion is not murder, because the fetus is like a tumor. But the work by the scientists from Cambridge University makes this view impossible. Because the placenta dynamically allocates resources between the mother and the fetus in a way that preserves the mother’s health, the fetus cannot be viewed as a tumor robbing the mother of nutrients. Instead, it looks as if the placenta’s function has been designed in such a way to ensure optimal health for both the mother and the fetus. This study also shows that if the mothers health is in jeopardy, the placenta actually compromises the health of the fetus so that the mother’s health is not unduly harmed by the pregnancy.

    Resources
    Curvaceous Anatomy of the Female Spine Reveals Ingenious Obstetric Design” by Virgil Robertson (article)
    What Are the Odds of You Being You? by Matthew McClure (article)
    Morning Sickness May Protect Embryos from Toxins with Fazale Rana (podcast)

    Endnotes
    1. Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri et al., “Maternal and Fetal Genomes Interplay through Phosphoinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)-p110α Signaling to Modify Placental Resource Allocation,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 113 (October 2016): 11255–60, doi:10.1073/pnas.1602012113.

About Reasons to Believe

RTB's mission is to spread the Christian Gospel by demonstrating that sound reason and scientific research—including the very latest discoveries—consistently support, rather than erode, confidence in the truth of the Bible and faith in the personal, transcendent God revealed in both Scripture and nature. Learn More »

Support Reasons to Believe

Your support helps more people find Christ through sharing how the latest scientific discoveries affirm our faith in the God of the Bible.

Donate Now

U.S. Mailing Address
818 S. Oak Park Rd.
Covina, CA 91724
  • P (855) 732-7667
  • P (626) 335-1480
  • Fax (626) 852-0178
Reasons to Believe logo