Reasons to Believe

Welcome to the Psalm 104 Unit Study!


Whether you plan to use this study in your family's homeschool, homeschool co-op, or private school classroom, our hope is that you will find in it many ways to draw your elementary-aged students' interest deeper into God's Word and His works in creation. Our goal is for you and your students to rejoice with the Psalmist: "Bless the Lord, O my soul!"

Here you will find additional resources to explore with your students, such as Internet links, informative videos, and relevant literature recommendations.

Lesson 1: Introduction to Psalm 104

Enjoy these samples of what other students created for their Psalm 104 cover art.

Katharina, age 8 Nathaniel, age 10

Share Your Student's Work with Us!
Send your student's Psalm 104 cover creations to us at homeschooling@reasons.org or use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see what your students come up with as they express their appreciation for God's creation.

Lesson 2: Ground Rules for Interpretation

Share Your Student's Work with Us!
Send your student's Psalm 104-based poetry to us at homeschooling@reasons.org or use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see their imaginative expressions about God's creation.

Lesson 3: Connecting Genesis 1 and Psalm 104

Share Your Student's Work with Us!
Video record your student's readers theater performance and send the link to homeschooling@reasons.org or use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see their inspired recitation of God's Word.

Lesson 4: Authorship and Psalm 104:1–4

Exploring the Water Cycle with Dr. Jeff Zweerink

Water Cycle from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

 

Science Integration: Exploring the Water Cycle
Explore the water cycle by reading a library book or visiting a website. See some suggested resources listed below to help you get started.

Web Resources:

Literature Resources:
The following books may be found at your local library or bookstore and they contain wonderful illustrations. Each explores the scientific content of the water cycle in visual, language-rich ways. Choose one or two books to share with your students or have them read on their own and share with the group.

  • A Drop Around the World by Barbara McKinney, illustrations by Michael S. Maydak, 1998. This picture book with poetic, rhyming text follows a drop of rain around the world. Symbols throughout the text are linked with science concepts, and the text ties in world geography. A teacher's guide is also available for adapting this book for further study.
  • Water Dance by Thomas Locker is illustrated with the author's beautiful oil paintings from nature and brief, poetic descriptions of water's various states. It is an inspiration for young writers and illustrators to create their own descriptions of God's works.
  • One Well: the Story of Water on Earth by Rochelle Strauss gives an environmental perspective on the water cycle and how it affects life everywhere on the planet. It is best suited for older readers, but can certainly be shared with younger readers as well. It may prompt discussion of ways we may help care for God's creation in our own time and place.

Lesson 5: Psalm 104:5–9

Science Integration: How Did the Continents Form?

Handouts from the USGS Website:


Enjoy this sample of one student's assembly of Pangaea.

Abby, age 10

Exploring Continent Formation with Dr. Jeff Zweerink

Continents from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

 

Explore the formation of the continents by reading a library book or visiting a website. See some suggested resources listed below to help you get started.

Web Resources:

Literature Resources:
The following books may be found at your local library or bookstore and they contain wonderful illustrations. Each explores the scientific processes involved in early continent formation in visual, language-rich ways. Choose one or two books to share with your students or have them read on their own and share with the group.

  • The Seven Continents (Rookie Read-About Geography) by Wil Mara. This picture book offers young readers a very basic introduction to our current continents.
  • Water Dance by Thomas Locker is illustrated with the author's beautiful oil paintings from nature and brief, poetic descriptions of water's various states. It is an inspiration for young writers and illustrators to create their own descriptions of God's works.
  • For older students: Origins: The Evolution of Continents, Oceans and Life by Ron Redfern offers an excellent introduction to Earth's plate tectonics history. It is best suited for older readers, but the pictures can certainly prompt discussions with younger readers as well.

Art Integration: Creating Water Boundaries with an Early Earth Watercolor Landscape

These videos provide instruction for the watercolor activity. The first video is an optional discussion of the supplies. The second video provides step-by-step instructions for students to make the watercolor picture.

Watercolor Supplies from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

 

Watercolor from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

Enjoy these samples of what other students created for their watercolor landscapes.

Katharina, age 8 Abby, age 10

Share Your Student's Work with Us!
Send your student's landscape creations to us at homeschooling@reasons.org or use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see what your students come up with as they express their appreciation for God's creation.

Lesson 6: Psalm 104:10–18

Bible Study

Explore the Animals of Psalm 104

  • Bible Places
  • Kids' Guide to Bible Animals by Jane Landreth, 2010.

Science Integration: Ecosystems
Explore the habitats of animals and their related ecosystems by reading a library book or visiting a website. See some suggested resources listed below to help you get started.

Web Resources:

Literature Resources:
The following books may be found at your local library or bookstore and they contain wonderful illustrations. Each explores the scientific related to ecosystems in visual, language-rich ways. Choose one or two books to share with your students or have them read on their own and share with the group.

  • Ecology (DK Eyewitness Books) by Brian Lane, Steve Pollock, 2003. This book is visually rich with photos and facts about the connections between animals, plants, energy, and matter in ecological systems. It includes plentiful resources for further study. Aimed at grades 1–6, the diversity of information and format invites children to browse on their own and/or share with an adult.
  • Life in a Forest, Life in a Cave, etc. (KidHaven Press Ecosystems series), 2005. This series of brief chapter books uses color photos and easy-to-read text to explore the various parts of a particular ecosystem, including living and nonliving elements such as soil and weather, plants and animals. If any habitats are facing threats, these are also discussed. A helpful glossary, index, and resource list for more information are included for each ecosystem in the series.
  • What Are Food Chains and Webs? (The Science of Living Things series) by Bobbie Kalman & Jaqueline Langille, 1998. Aimed at grades 2–4, this picture book defines and illustrates how plants and animals interact in their environment based on what they eat. Instructions for a food web game are included as a simple and effective way to demonstrate the concept of food webs to a group of children.
  • A Place for Bats, Melissa Stewart (Author) and Higgins Bond (Illustrator), 2012. This book discusses the habitats and habits of several species of bats and their interaction with humans. Each page includes practical ways people can help preserve and promote ecosystems where each bat needs to thrive.

Lesson 7: Psalm 104:19–23

Art & Science Integration: Creation Timeline
Here are some printable illustrations help decorate your students’ timeline. Right-click on the links below to download to your computer. Color, cut and attach using glue, tape or glue dots.

Want more pictures? You can browse the Prehistory.com web site for additional ideas.

Enjoy this sample of a student's completed timeline panels.

 
Abby, age 10  

Science Integration: Animal Activities Observations

Sun, Moon, and Stars with Dr. Jeff Zweerink

Sun, Moon, and Stars from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

 

Explore the behaviors of animals according to their body clocks by reading a library book or visiting a website. See some suggested resources listed below to help you get started.

Web Resources:

Literature Resources:
The following books may be found at your local library or bookstore and they contain wonderful illustrations. Each explores the scientific related to animals and their body clocks in visual, language-rich ways. Choose one or two books to share with your students or have them read on their own and share with the group.

  • Keeping a Nature Journal: Discover a Whole New Way of Seeing the World around You by Clare Walker Leslie and Charles E. Roth. This thorough, beautiful guide to observing nature emphasizes drawing as a tool for closer and deeper observation of things studied. Appropriate for all ages.
  • Night Science for Kids: Exploring the World After Dark by Terry Krautwurst. This is a guide for engaging in safe outdoor science activities for older elementary-age children and their parents.
  • Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night by Joyce Sidman (Author), Rick Allen (Illustrator). A high-quality picture and poetry book for grades 3–6 that explores creatures and sounds of the outdoor world at night.
  • I See the Animals Sleeping: A Bedtime Story by Thomas M. Heffron (Author), Roberta Baird (Illustrator). A picture book for grades K–2 depicting animals' nighttime habits in various environments that also encourages human children to go to sleep at night!
  • Stellaluna by Janell Cannon. A wonderfully illustrated picture book for grades K–3 incorporating scientific information about nocturnal fruit bats, contrasting their habits to diurnal birds while exploring themes of identity, belonging, and friendship.

Lesson 8: Psalm 104:24–30

Science Integration: Biodeposits
Explore the major extinction events in Earth's history and investigate their role in the formation of biodeposits. Some suggested resources are listed below to help you get started.

Exploring Biodeposits with Dr. Jeff Zweerink

Biodeposits from Reasons Institute on Vimeo.

 

Web Resources:

Literature Resources:
The following books may be found at your local library or bookstore and they contain wonderful illustrations. Each explores the scientific related to biodeposits and fossil fuels in visual, language-rich ways. Choose one or two books to share with your students or have them read on their own and share with the group.

  • Energy (DK See for Yourself series) by Chris Woodford, 2007. A high-quality overview of many forms of energy, including fossil fuels. Appropriate for ages 9–12, this book includes a helpful glossary and index of terms
  • Fossils Tell of Long Ago (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2 series) by Aliki, 1972, revised 1990. This introduction to fossils (for ages 5–8) tells how fossils form.
  • Fossil Fuels: A Resource Our World Depends On (Managing Our Resources) by Ian Graham, 2004. For grades 1–3, a photo exploration of fossil resources, how they are made, and how they can be used sustainably.
  • What's So Bad About Gasoline? Fossil Fuels and What They Do (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2 series) by Anne Rockwell (Author), Paul Meisel (Illustrator), 2009. This book for grades 1–6 takes a look at the history and development of fossil fuels from ancient China to the present day. It emphasizes environmental damage caused by burning fossil fuels and ends with a brief discussion of fuel alternatives and ways to reduce carbon emissions.

Lesson 9: Psalm 104:33–35

Enjoy this sample of a student's completed scale model timeline.

Abby, age 10  

Hymns Based on Themes in Psalm 104:

Songs Based on Themes in Psalm 104:

  • Creation Song (performed by Fernando Ortega)
  • Psalm 104 (in Hebrew––performed by Yamma Ensemble)
  • I Will Bless the Lord (Psalm 104––performed by Mark Baldwin)

Share Your Student's Work with Us!
Send your student's worship songs to us at homeschooling@reasons.org or use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see what your students come up with as they express their lyrical appreciation for God's creation.


Questions?

If you have questions while using this curriculum, feel free to contact us at homeschooling@reasons.org.


Share Your Student's Work with Us!

We hope you have a great time exploring God's Word and God's world with your students. Send your work samples to homeschooling@reasons.org. You can also post your student's creations online and use #RTBPs104. We'd love to see what your students come up with as they express their appreciation for God's creation.


Additional Resources

For more information about homeschool resources from Reasons to Believe, please visit us on the web at ReasonsAcademy.com.