Reasons to Believe

Trigonometric Distance to Andromeda Galaxy

TNRTB Archive - Retained for reference information

Princeton University astronomers have developed a new distance measuring technique that soon will dramatically improve the capacity of astronomers to uncover more evidence for the supernatural creation of the universe and for the supernatural design of the universe for the benefit of life. Accurate, direct distance measurements to nearby galaxies provide a foundational step for astronomers. These measurements help determine the manner in which the universe was created and the quality of design in the density parameters that govern cosmic expansion so as to make life possible. The Princeton team noted that dust in the Andromeda Galaxy overlaps the image of a much more distant galaxy that emits short-period x-ray fluctuations. The team calculated that measurements made with currently available instruments, of different times when such fluctuations stimulate a response in the Andromeda Galaxy’s dust, can produce a trigonometric determination of the Andromeda Galaxy’s distance that is accurate to one percent precision. This factor-of-five improvement in the distance measurement to Andromeda potentially will deliver even more impressive evidence for a superintelligent, supernatural Creator than we possess today.

o   B. T. Draine and Nicholas A. Bond, “Direct Extragalactic Distance Determination Using X-Ray Scattering,” Astrophysical Journal 617 (2004): 987-1003.

o   http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/v617/n2/60976/brief/60976.abstract.html

·         Related Resource

o   Hugh Ross and John Rea, “Big Bang—The Bible Taught It First!

·         Product Spotlight

o   The Creator and the Cosmos, 3rd ed., by Hugh Ross

Subjects: Galaxy Design

Dr. Hugh Ross

Reasons to Believe emerged from my passion to research, develop, and proclaim the most powerful new reasons to believe in Christ as Creator, Lord, and Savior and to use those new reasons to reach people for Christ. Read more about Dr. Hugh Ross.