Reasons to Believe

More Evidence for the Design of Earthquake Activity

Faulting, generated by active and widespread tectonics, allowed a youthful Earth to support diverse and abundant life.

In the December 2007 issue of Astrobiology Stanford University geophysicists Norman H. Sleep and Mark D. Zoback note that the higher tectonic activity during Earth’s early history could have played a key role in cycling critically important nutrients and energy sources for life.1 The production of numerous small faults in the brittle primordial crust released trapped nutrients. Such faults could also release pockets of methane gas and molecular hydrogen. The methane and hydrogen could then provide crucial energy sources for nonphotosynthetic life. Finally, the production of faults could bring water to otherwise arid habitats, such as rocks far below Earth’s surface.

Faulting, generated by active and widespread tectonics, allowed a youthful Earth to support diverse and abundant life. This enhanced diversity and abundance of life quickly transformed Earth’s surface into an environment safe for advanced life. Also, the buildup of biodeposits for the support of human civilization occurred more rapidly due to active tectonics.

The more rapid preparation of Earth for humanity is critical. Without such rapid preparation, humans could not come upon the terrestrial scene before the Sun’s increasing luminosity would make their presence impossible (due to excessive heat).2 Thus, yet one more reason exists to thank God for His supernatural design of Earth’s tectonics.

Subjects: Biodeposits, Extrasolar Planets, First Life on Earth, Geophysical Design, Habitable Planets, Natural Disasters, Plate Tectonics, Solar System Design, TCM - Cosmic Design

Dr. Hugh Ross

Reasons to Believe emerged from my passion to research, develop, and proclaim the most powerful new reasons to believe in Christ as Creator, Lord, and Savior and to use those new reasons to reach people for Christ. Read more about Dr. Hugh Ross.

References:

  1. Norman H. Sleep and Mark D. Zoback, “Did Earthquakes Keep the Early Crust Habitable?” Astrobiology 7 (December, 2007): 1023-32.
  2. Hugh Ross, Creation As Science (Colorado Springs: NavPress, 2006): 126-36.